Author Topic: Bain and CRC.  (Read 1593 times)

Offline SocialTransparency

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Bain and CRC.
« on: November 24, 2012, 23:44 »
 I am not in anyway attempting to politicize a thread here. I AM slowly coming to the realization many area's within rehabilitation services here in the USA are about the money,not the patient. What woke me up to this sad fact was from a video shot during a recent narCONon of Georgia protest.

 Though hard to hear,one does get the impression that a tremendous amount of our fellow countrymen do in fact profit massively on the backs of those sick or in need!

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0Bml96HXAo&feature=relmfu

 Please read this attached article. NarCONon is not the only rotten apple in the barrel!

 http://www.salon.com/2012/07/18/dark_side_of_a_bain_success/
 
http://www.tennessean.com/section/projects23
 

Offline snippy

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Re: Bain and CRC.
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2012, 00:59 »
But again - enter CARF.  The last link you posted led to this article from Jul 17, 2011:


Public in dark on rehab records
2008 change moved inspections from state to outside control



Offline ethercat

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Re: Bain and CRC.
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2012, 06:53 »
I AM slowly coming to the realization many area's within rehabilitation services here in the USA are about the money,not the patient.
...
http://www.tennessean.com/section/projects23
 

It has become big business, not only the facilities themselves, but training and accrediting organizations.  I don't know if any of these others try to actively recruit and convert addicts to be cult members, as Narconon does, though.

But again - enter CARF.  The last link you posted led to this article from Jul 17, 2011:


Public in dark on rehab records
2008 change moved inspections from state to outside control




Nate Rau, the author at The Tennessean, might like to know what we know about CARF. 

CARF and Responsibility

Quote
In a move that went largely unnoticed by legislators and advocates, the Tennessee rules governing residential drug and alcohol treatment centers were dramatically narrowed in 2008 after an executive order from Bredesen that shifted the inspection process from the Department of Health to the Department of Mental Health.

Subsequently, the state elected to authorize nonprofit accreditation organizations to perform detailed inspections.

Before the switch, facilities had to demonstrate to the state details about their operations, such as plans for transporting patients in the event of an emergency.
Private inspections' quality questioned

Questions have been raised about the quality of inspections for rehab centers after the death last year of 29-year-old Lindsey Poteet, a patient at New Life Lodge who died after being taken by van to a hospital in Nashville when she became ill. Records indicate there may have been two additional deaths reported by New Life Lodge in 2010.

Because New Life Lodge is certified by a nonprofit agency, the Commission on the Accreditation of Residential Facilities, or CARF, inspection reports about its emergency transportation policy, along with any CARF review of the facility after Poteet’s death, are not public record.

New Life Lodge had its three-year accreditation renewed by CARF earlier this year. The only reports made public by CARF are cursory survey results, and those take six weeks to access once a request is made.

Dick Blackburn, executive director for the Tennessee Association of Mental Health Organizations, said it was not unusual for states to outsource health-care inspections to outside agencies like CARF.

New Life Lodge touts its CARF accreditation and points out that surveys conducted by the agency indicate the facility is doing its job.

“CARF survey officials noted many existing strengths in New Life Lodge’s operations, including its leadership, communication and patient satisfaction,” a recent news release from New Life Lodge stated. “In a letter to the facility, CARF International President and CEO, Brian Boon, Ph.D., wrote: ‘Your organization should take pride in achieving this high level of accreditation. This achievement is an indication of your organization’s dedication and commitment to improving the quality of lives of the persons served.’ ”

There's a booklet from SAMHSA, though old, that lists the states that allow CARF to do their certifying:
http://forum.reachingforthetippingpoint.net/index.php/topic,10580.msg24729.html#msg24729
   Narconon Reviews
   Independent Reviews of the Narconon Drug Rehab Programs
   Answers to Frequently Asked But Seldom Answered Questions

Offline BigBeard

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Re: Bain and CRC.
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2012, 07:57 »
Keep in mind that it was SAMHSA that dragged CARF, which up to that point had only be dealing with physical and occupational rehabs, into the drug/alchohol rehab accreditation business. CARF didn't go looking for it. And it was in large part because they had not been working in that area, one William Kent "Conflict of Interest" McGregor was hired by CARF because of his "expertise" on durg/alchohol rehab.

BigBeard

Offline mefree

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Re: Bain and CRC.
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2014, 10:03 »
Quote
Questions have been raised about the quality of inspections for rehab centers after the death last year of 29-year-old Lindsey Poteet, a patient at New Life Lodge who died after being taken by van to a hospital in Nashville when she became ill.

Boy, that sounds familiar. I can't can believe the state allowed them to reopen.  (:E)
http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/dec/27/lawsuit-against-tennessee-drug-rehab-center-settle/
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