Author Topic: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?  (Read 6992 times)

Offline ethercat

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Darrell Hall's Discovery House in Georgia

The toll free number from Discovery course 877) 647-7620 also lead to this site...

which seems to be running rehab services, with Darrell Hall as ED. There are professionals shown on here as well.. wonder if he's operating this aside from Narconon or this is just a front page to make them look legit?

http://discovertreatment.com/professionalsstaff/

From the FAQ:
http://discovertreatment.com/frequently-asked-questions/

Quote
Is Discovery House a licensed drug rehab program?

Discovery House is accredited by the Georgia Association Of Recovery Residences and hosts faith based and self help meetings on site.  The strength of our approach is the extended network of licensed programs and counselors we refer to, all while you are living in the comfort and safety of an accredited sober living facility.

In other words, NO.

New Narconon Half-way House in Clearwater

Operators of Scientology rehab center to open Clearwater halfway house
Quote from: Tampa Bay Times
Operators of a drug rehabilitation center in Hernando County, which uses Scientology-affiliated Narconon treatments under intense scrutiny in several states, plan to open a 60-bed halfway house in Clearwater.

And they won't say why.

Narconon Arrowhead changing to halfway house

State officials called to testify before grand jury on Narconon Arrowhead
Quote from: Tulsa World
The facility has now applied for certification as a substance abuse halfway house, defined by state law as one that provides “low intensity substance abuse treatment in a supportive living environment to facilitate the individual’s reintegration into the community.”

“This application is currently being processed to determine whether they meet all applicable standards,” Dismukes said.

Riggs said Narconon Arrowhead is “changing their mission” to comply with the new state law.

Also see: ESMB: Narconon Arrowhead applying for certification as a halfway house

Is this Narconon's new strategy, to open halfway houses, which have less stringent (or non-existent) licensing regulations, where they can still work toward their goals of getting money and recruiting vulnerable people into scientology, even including the "books" (the TRs), but without the messy business of inpatient licensing, operating saunas, and delivering vitamin overdoses?

Will this strategy extend to all Narconons?

Will the halfway houses be any better run than the Narconon treatment facilities, where there is rampant alcohol and drug use, and sex between clients and staff?
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 10:57 by ethercat »
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Offline SocialTransparency

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2014, 16:16 »
 The house -o- Darrell is accredited by GARR. Now what does that actually mean?

http://www.addictionpro.com/article/raising-bar-recovery-residences

 My question is whom or what approves GARR within the state of Georgia?

http://www.garronline.org/standards.html

 

Offline BigBeard

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2014, 20:03 »
My gut says within a month, six at most, after opening these "halfway house" operations will be offering the same sauna and vitamin bomb crap as narCONon. And they'll get away with pushing $cientology on it's victims as part of their "faith based" operation. They just won't explain what faith it's based on.
BigBeard

Offline DeathHamster

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2014, 10:48 »
Since the "halfway houses" are going to be run by Narconon staff, and the one bit of training that they've had is in doing things the Narconon way, it'll be the same-old from the git-go. Possibly they'll try to hide it at first, but that'll last as long as the clean-ups they do when they know there's going to be an inspection.

Anyone not agreeing to the "voluntary" program will probably be kicked out.


Offline Mary_McConnell

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2014, 20:12 »
We are going to be finding the same crap going on with Arrowhead as we did with Georgia...
I am a volunteer advocate for victims of the Narconon scam. I am a former scientologist. I post anonymously. Mary McConnell is my long time nom de plume. Feel free to contact me for assistance in righting the wrongs.

Offline NarcononHater

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2014, 11:20 »
Hey guys, I haven't checked this site in awhile :(

I'm not sure if this means anything but... When I was at Narconon after you passed the sauna program you could move off campus into a house or apartment. At least one staff member had to live in the dwelling as well. While I was there I remember some guy telling me how this is illegal. Basically, NarCONon moves you off campus, so they can free up "beds" for new victims. From what I was told that was against the law/code?

Does anyone know anything about this?

Offline Mary_McConnell

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2014, 13:03 »
Hey guys, I haven't checked this site in awhile :(

I'm not sure if this means anything but... When I was at Narconon after you passed the sauna program you could move off campus into a house or apartment. At least one staff member had to live in the dwelling as well. While I was there I remember some guy telling me how this is illegal. Basically, NarCONon moves you off campus, so they can free up "beds" for new victims. From what I was told that was against the law/code?

Does anyone know anything about this?

Are you talking about Vista Bay? BTW, nice to have you posting again. Hope all is well for you and your family :)
I am a volunteer advocate for victims of the Narconon scam. I am a former scientologist. I post anonymously. Mary McConnell is my long time nom de plume. Feel free to contact me for assistance in righting the wrongs.

Offline mefree

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2014, 17:18 »
Hey guys, I haven't checked this site in awhile :(

I'm not sure if this means anything but... When I was at Narconon after you passed the sauna program you could move off campus into a house or apartment. At least one staff member had to live in the dwelling as well. While I was there I remember some guy telling me how this is illegal. Basically, NarCONon moves you off campus, so they can free up "beds" for new victims. From what I was told that was against the law/code?

Does anyone know anything about this?

Oh, this could present all kinds of problems, but it depends on what you mean by illegal. It's certainly insurance fraud if Narconon is billing for inpatient treatment while the client is in off-campus housing. Also, it would depend on state regulations and client's status for such a transfer.
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Offline Sunshine

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2014, 20:42 »
As far as Fresh Start Sunshine Summit Lodge (SSL) they operate under state and county regulations, the state requires the facilities to obtain a fire clearance (Form 850) from the County Fire Marshall on the buildings  prior to them (state) issuing the facilities a licenses.  The county required SSL to obtain a Major Use Permit (MUP) prior to opening the facilities which describe ALL the buildings that have been inspected.
Link to MUP here http://forum.reachingforthetippingpoint.net/index.php/topic,12748.0.html

In 2012 SSL was issued a Cease and Desist from, at that time California Drug and Alcohol  Program (ADP)
for three unlicensed facilities,  the Big House, the Barn and the Top House  http://wwwtest.adp.ca.gov/Licensing/pdf/Suspended_and_Revoked_Programs.pdf
http://forum.reachingforthetippingpoint.net/index.php/topic,11980.20.html
http://narcononreviews.net/documents/formal_complaints/FormalComplaint-California-2013-02-23-DeptOfAlcoholAndDrugPrograms.pdf

The Top House is actually located on the SSL property and was/is inspected by the County Fire Marshall but due to the MUP that building (Top House) can only be used for staff housing.

Fresh Start JLB Ranch (JLBR) was started a few years after SSL and does not require a MUP due to serving six or fewer clients but as mentioned in another thread it is licensed by the State therefore requires a Fire Permit.

There are two buildings on the property, the actual  facility which is a single story house has been inspected and the another referred by the cease and desist as "The Barn".

The ONLY building that has been inspected by the county and a licensed issued by the state is the single story building that can house six clients and two staff.
http://forum.reachingforthetippingpoint.net/index.php/topic,6887.msg16645.html#msg16645

Please note that Narconon Fresh Start Sunshine Summit Lodge and Narconon Fresh Start JLB Ranch are two separate facilities and should not be sharing resources.


Offline Mary_McConnell

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2014, 23:12 »
Over on ESMB, Communicator IC posted :
http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?36791-Scientology-related-Narconon-rehab-center-may-have-violated-law

Default Scientology-related Narconon rehab center may have violated law

    Tampa Bay Times: Scientology-related Narconon rehab center may have violated law
     
http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/scientology-related-rehab-may-have-violated-law/2194630
    Excerpt:
    When the Scientology-affiliated Narconon drug treatment center in Spring Hill was told by Hernando County it could not expand its residential facility, the center didn't try to make do with existing space.

    Its officers rented three properties elsewhere in Spring Hill and expanded there. That allowed the center to admit more patients. Narconon charges up to $30,000 for a three-month stay.

    One site was in a commercial center. Narconon shuttled patients there for what director Tammy Strickling described as "daily therapeutic classes.'' The other two sites were houses. One slept eight, the other six. Narconon staffers, trainees and overflow patients bunked there.

    "I don't like turning anyone away,'' Strickling said in court last year.

    But all three rented locations may have violated state law.

    Substance abuse treatment centers in Florida are required to deliver services only at licensed facilities. Since Narconon opened in 2008, it had been licensed by the state Department of Children and Families to provide services at one place, 8213 Cessna Drive.

    "My mouth is hanging open,'' said Department of Children and Families licensure specialist Troy McDermott, when told of the rented sites. In his 21 years at DCF, he never has encountered a center providing services at unlicensed facilities, he said.

    Penalties can range from a moratorium on patient admissions to loss of license.

    Strickling declined to be interviewed for this story. In an email Friday night, she said her facility, also known as Suncoast Rehabilitation Center, was licensed at the rented commercial space, which is on Hearth Road.

    It was, but just by a matter of hours.

    Earlier Friday, DCF had issued Narconon a temporary license to provide "intensive outpatient'' services at the site. Its application had arrived mid-week, as the Tampa Bay Times was asking Narconon's leadership team for comment.

I am a volunteer advocate for victims of the Narconon scam. I am a former scientologist. I post anonymously. Mary McConnell is my long time nom de plume. Feel free to contact me for assistance in righting the wrongs.

Offline ethercat

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2014, 09:41 »
Hey guys, I haven't checked this site in awhile :(

I'm not sure if this means anything but... When I was at Narconon after you passed the sauna program you could move off campus into a house or apartment. At least one staff member had to live in the dwelling as well. While I was there I remember some guy telling me how this is illegal. Basically, NarCONon moves you off campus, so they can free up "beds" for new victims. From what I was told that was against the law/code?

Does anyone know anything about this?

Hi NarcononHater.   __WB__

If a facility is licensed for a certain number of patients, and the facility houses some people offsite to go above that number, then yes, that is against the law.
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Offline DeathHamster

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Re: Are halfway houses a new strategy for Narconons in trouble?
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2014, 12:21 »
A relevant comment in the Bunker. It seems the Dutch Narconon was forced to go the halfway house route, and was then busted for doing standard Narconon, same as always.

http://tonyortega.org/2014/08/26/more-trouble-for-scientologys-drug-rehab-network-narconon-this-time-in-florida/#comment-1559866654
Quote
scamofscientology • 3 hours ago

Perhaps this is a good moment for a short recap and update of the Dutch Narconon. The Dutch Healthcare inspection started an investigation into the Dutch Narconon in early 2013. The deal they reached with Narconon was that Narconon would operate as a half-way house rather than a drug rehab. With this deal, the Inspection gained at least that Narconon wouldn't put patients with withdrawal symptoms through their dangerous niacin/sauna nonsense. For Narconon, this deal has the advantage that they are no longer regulated by tough quality of healthcare laws. And although there is another set of regulations attached to insurance laws, this is an opt in law. In exchange for not being able to make insurance claims, Narconon opted out. As a result, Narconon Netherlands is now virtually unregulated (I’ll get back to that ‘virtually’ below).
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