Author Topic: 1/7/2016 Public Hearing on Special Use Permit for Best Drug Rehabilitation  (Read 1890 times)

Offline Mary_McConnell

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We should be hearing soon from Miss Fortune on this matter, but I just want to alert the public...

Here we go again...Per Wickstrom trying to bully another Planning Commission: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The City of Manistee Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing in the Council to consider a request from: NAME: Best Drug Rehabilitation - for a Special Use Permit for Mixed Use. DATE/TIME OF HEARING: Thursday, January 7, 2016 at 7 pm  Chambers, City Hall, 70 Maple Street, Manistee, Michigan

This is an unbranded Narconon facility. Please share
Interested parties are welcome to attend the hearing, or written comments with signature can be submitted to: Denise Blakeslee, Planning & Zoning Administrator, City of Manistee, 70 Maple Street, Manistee, MI 49660, (231) 398-2805



I am a volunteer advocate for victims of the Narconon scam. I am a former scientologist. I post anonymously. Mary McConnell is my long time nom de plume. Feel free to contact me for assistance in righting the wrongs.

Offline DeathHamster

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Hmm. I'm surprised to see a reappearance of TIA Corp. I thought that was chained to Per's ex-wife and dropped into a deep section of the lake.

Considering that there is a Best Drug Rehabilitation, Inc., I think Per is playing the Name Game to confuse exactly which corporate identities are involved.

http://www.haddockseyes.com/

Offline Miss Fortune

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MANISTEE HEARING: Will Per Wickstrom's Best Drug Rehabilitation #2 really host NA and AA meetings, or will it merely use the 900 Vine Street facility as an overflow for Best Drug Rehabilitation's Care Center Drive location, a device to allow the Care Center location to admit even more clients?

http://www.glisteningquiveringunderbelly.blogspot.com/2016/01/per-wickstroms-tia-corporation-proposed.html

Offline Mary_McConnell

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Terrific 'must read' article! The points about funding and Per Wickstrom's TIA corp being a potential  AA and AA meeting landlord are very good.
I am a volunteer advocate for victims of the Narconon scam. I am a former scientologist. I post anonymously. Mary McConnell is my long time nom de plume. Feel free to contact me for assistance in righting the wrongs.

Offline BigBeard

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I wondered about BDR implying the AA/NA meetings were part of their program. I've known many who participated in AA over the years, and never heard of it being part of another rehab program before. The AA group might rent space somewhere if a donated space wasn't available, but other than the normal fire safety, etc., things, the landlord had no say in the meetings themselves.
BigBeard

Offline DeathHamster

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AA/NA makes a useful facade because neither organization is likely to take action or even comment over a bogus claim, by policy.

Offline Alcie

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The special use permit was approved.

Offline Miss Fortune

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Offline Miss Fortune

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Here's the news story, as it appeared in the local fish wrapper:
http://glisteningquiveringunderbelly.blogspot.com/2016/01/manistee-planning-commission-approves.html



An update on Per Wickstrom's claim (through his surrogate, attorney Tom King) that the proposed modifications to the 900 Vine Street structure will be made to offer a meeting place for Narcotics Anonymous (NA) and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA).  That claim was cited as the "primary" use for the building. Secondarily, the application claimed the location would be used to provide "intensive outpatient meetings".

Not so fast!

A draft of the meeting minutes has been issued, and those minutes reveal shocking information...OK, it's not really "shocking", just disappointing:

"Commissioner Barry said that the community already has AA and NA meetings and asked if they have
been contacted about this facility.

Tom King said they have not contacted anyone; they were waiting for approval before reaching out."

But that wouldn't be the first time a Wickstrom surrogate mislead a group of public officials.

Back on March 4, 2015, Amber Howe (identified then as the Chief Operating Officer of Serenity Recovery, Inc.) made a presentation at Lakeshore Regional Partners Substance Abuse Oversight Policy Board meeting in Muskegon. Lakeshore serves as the Prepaid Inpatient Health Plan (PIHP) under contract with the Michigan Department of Community Health to manage all Medicaid and Adult Benefit Waiver (ABW) specialty behavioral health services provided by the following counties:  Allegan, Kent, Lake, Mason, Muskegon, Oceana, and Ottawa.

Howe was seeking a letter of support from Lakeshore on behalf of Marne's Serenity LARA application, and stated that "Dr. Kerry Mark Simon is the medical director and addictionologist" and "Dr. Ted Zunini is the consulting psychiatrist".

The problem is, it appears there's no "Dr. Zunini" licensed here in Michigan...or anywhere else!

http://www.manisteemi.gov/ArchiveCenter/ViewFile/Item/2799

Offline ethercat

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First off, I am not an expert on either NA or AA, and have never been in either, but...

There are NA groups, and NA meetings, which are not the same thing.  The basis is a group, not a meeting place.  Groups find meeting places, not the other way around.  It appears to be much the same with AA.

Here is NA's Group Booklet for specific information about starting a new group or meeting.  More information at na.org and aa.org

I think it's going to be pretty difficult for Per to adhere to the 12 Traditions for either organization.

Quote
The Twelve Traditions of Narcotics Anonymous

1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends on NA unity.

2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.

3. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using.

4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or NA as a whole.

5. Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry the message to the addict who still suffers.

6. An NA group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the NA name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, or prestige divert us from our primary purpose.

7. Every NA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.

8. Narcotics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.

9. NA, as such, ought never be organized, but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.

10. Narcotics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the NA name ought never be drawn into public controversy.

11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.

12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.



Quote
The Twelve Traditions (Alcoholics Anonymous)

Our A.A. experience has taught us that:

One—Each member of Alcoholics Anonymous is but a small part of a great whole. A.A. must continue to live or most of us will surely die. Hence our common welfare comes first. But individual welfare follows close afterward.

Two—For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience.

Three—Our membership ought to include all who suffer from alcoholism. Hence we may refuse none who wish to recover. Nor ought A.A. membership ever depend upon money or conformity. Any two or three alcoholics gathered together for sobriety may call themselves an A.A. group, provided that, as a group, they have no other affiliation.

Four—With respect to its own affairs, each A.A. group should be responsible to no other authority than its own conscience. But when its plans concern the welfare of neighboring groups also, those groups ought to be consulted. And no group, regional committee, or individual should ever take any action that might greatly affect A.A. as a whole without conferring with the trustees of the General Service Board. On such issues our common welfare is paramount.

Five—Each Alcoholics Anonymous group ought to be a spiritual entity having but one primary purpose—that of carrying its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

Six—Problems of money, property, and authority may easily divert us from our primary spiritual aim. We think, therefore, that any considerable property of genuine use to A.A. should be separately incorporated and managed, thus dividing the material from the spiritual. An A.A. group, as such, should never go into business. Secondary aids to A.A., such as clubs or hospitals which require much property or administration, ought to be incorporated and so set apart that, if necessary, they can be freely discarded by the groups. Hence such facilities ought not to use the A.A. name. Their management should be the sole responsibility of those people who financially support them. For clubs, A.A. managers are usually preferred. But hospitals, as well as other places of recuperation, ought to be well outside A.A.—and medically supervised. While an A.A. group may cooperate with anyone, such cooperation ought never to go so far as affiliation or endorsement, actual or implied. An A.A. group can bind itself to no one.

Seven—The A.A. groups themselves ought to be fully supported by the voluntary contributions of their own members. We think that each group should soon achieve this ideal; that any public solicitation of funds using the name of Alcoholics Anonymous is highly dangerous, whether by groups, clubs, hospitals, or other outside agencies; that acceptance of large gifts from any source, or of contributions carrying any obligation whatever, is unwise. Then, too, we view with much concern those A.A. treasuries which continue, beyond prudent reserves, to accumulate funds for no stated A.A. purpose. Experience has often warned us that nothing can so surely destroy our spiritual heritage as futile disputes over property, money, and authority.

Eight—Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever non- professional. We define professionalism as the occupation of counseling alcoholics for fees or hire. But we may employ alcoholics where they are going to perform those services for which we might otherwise have to engage nonalcoholics. Such special services may be well recompensed. But our usual A.A. Twelfth Step work is never to be paid for.

Nine—Each A.A. group needs the least possible organization. Rotating leadership is the best. The small group may elect its secretary, the large group its rotating committee, and the groups of a large metropolitan area their central or intergroup committee, which often employs a full-time secretary. The trustees of the General Service Board are, in effect, our A.A. General Service Committee. They are the custodians of our A.A. Tradition and the receivers of voluntary A.A. contributions by which we maintain our A.A. General Service Office at New York. They are authorized by the groups to handle our overall public relations and they guarantee the integrity of our principal newspaper, the A.A. Grapevine. All such representatives are to be guided in the spirit of service, for true leaders in A.A. are but trusted and experienced servants of the whole. They derive no real authority from their titles; they do not govern. Universal respect is the key to their usefulness.

Ten—No A.A. group or member should ever, in such a way as to implicate A.A., express any opinion on outside controversial issues—particularly those of politics, alcohol reform, or sectarian religion. The Alcoholics Anonymous groups oppose no one. Concerning such matters they can express no views whatever.

Eleven—Our relations with the general public should be characterized by personal anonymity. We think A.A. ought to avoid sensational advertising. Our names and pictures as A.A. members ought not be broadcast, filmed, or publicly printed. Our public relations should be guided by the principle of attraction rather than promotion. There is never need to praise ourselves. We feel it better to let our friends recommend us.

Twelve—And finally, we of Alcoholics Anonymous believe that the principle of anonymity has an immense spiritual significance. It reminds us that we are to place principles before personalities; that we are actually to practice a genuine humility. This to the end that our great blessings may never spoil us; that we shall forever live in thankful contemplation of Him who presides over us all.

This is more of Per's %BS|P and yes, Death Hamster is correct when he says:
AA/NA makes a useful facade because neither organization is likely to take action or even comment over a bogus claim, by policy.

Hopefully existing AA and/or NA members will be able to quietly divert any vulnerable souls who might be taken in by these meetings, if any do indeed occur (which I doubt).
   Narconon Reviews
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Offline Mary_McConnell

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Good post, ethercat. I agree. Per Wickstrom is a scientologist and scientologists do not believe it addiction a disease.
I am a volunteer advocate for victims of the Narconon scam. I am a former scientologist. I post anonymously. Mary McConnell is my long time nom de plume. Feel free to contact me for assistance in righting the wrongs.