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Author Topic: Hubbard's take on other religions ...  (Read 3171 times)

Stutroup

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Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« on: September 18, 2010, 12:12 »
I did some work gathering information on Scientology's supposed compatibility with other religions.  When I started, I knew I had heard some recordings of his denouncement of Christ, and his horrible words about the Kaaba and Mohammed.  I had heard Hubbard believed he was the reincarnation of the Buddha, and that he had been involved in Crowley's Satanism.

Ultimately, Hubbard read about, if he did not study, many religions.  He either incorporated aspects of different religions into Scientology (while corrupting them from the original), or he decided to discredit them altogether.

But before I continue, I'll ask: Do the mods and members of this forum prefer a separate thread for each of the four religions I've researched in relation to Hubbard, or should they all be included in one thread?
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mefree

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2010, 12:20 »
Continue on here.............I'm interested.
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2010, 13:04 »
Since what I have is for a flier, it'll be short, but I'll start with mostly copypasta, section by section.

The controversy begins:

Scientology's claim of compatibility with other religions is both claimed and denied:

Scientology presents itself as compatible with (almost) all other religions. For example, some quotes from a press release by Sholeh Patrick* on Free Republic:

“No one is asked to accept anything as belief or on faith. That which is true for you is what you have observed to be true. Each individual discovers truth for himself through observation, self-awareness, and experience. This is why Scientology is compatible with nearly any other religion.”

“Spanning 129 countries and about 500,000 members, Scientologists rank 22nd among world religions. It may be difficult for a full count, as it is more applied philosophy than religion, and thus allows members to belong to other faiths and still fully practice Scientology.”
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2082290/posts

*  (The writer of the Free Republic article, Sholeh Patrick, did a series of articles on minority religions, based on each religion's own claims. Sholeh has no public association with the Church of Scientology)

However, when the Church of Scientology applied for tax exempt status, the following statement was entered as qualifying the group as a religion:

“Although there is no policy or Scriptural mandate expressly requiring Scientologists to renounce other religious beliefs or membership in other churches, as a practical matter Scientologists are expected to and do become fully devoted to Scientology to the exclusion of other faiths. As Scientologists, they are required to look only to Scientology Scriptures for the answers to the fundamental questions of their existence and to seek enlightenment only from Scientology.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientology_and_other_religions#Religious_compatibility

Hubbard, himself, had some interesting things to say about Scientology's compatibility with other religions, too:
“It is all very well to idealize poverty and associate wisdom with begging bowls, or virtue with low estate. However, those who have done this (Buddhists, Christians, Communists and other fanatics) have dead ended or are dead ending.”
L. Ron Hubbard, HCO PL of January 21, 1965
« Last Edit: September 18, 2010, 13:13 by Stutroup »
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2010, 13:07 »
Hubbard and Christianity


“Half of Scientologists also report being Christians”
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2082290/posts

In OT VIII, the current highest course and level of Scientology, subscribers are taught that Christ is a myth:

“For those of you whose Christian toes I have stepped on, let me take the opportunity to disabuse you of some lovely myths. For instance, the historic Jesus was not nearly the sainted figure he has been made out to be. In addition to being a lover of young boys and men, he was given to uncontrollable bursts of temper and hatred that belied the general message of love, understanding, and other typical Marcab PR .. yet man still clings to the ideal, so deep and insidious the biological implanting."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeosYvdUuxQ
http://www.xs4all.nl/~kspaink/fishman/index2.html

"Anyway, Everyman is then shown to have been crucified so don't think that it's an accident that this crucifixion, they found out that this applied. Somebody somewhere on this planet, back about 600 BC, found some pieces of R6, and I don't know how they found it, either by watching madmen or something, but since that time they have used it and it became what is known as Christianity. The man on the Cross. There was no Christ. But the man on the cross is shown as Everyman. So of course each person seeing a crucified man, has an immediate feeling of sympathy for this man. Therefore you get many PCs who says they are Christ. Now, there's two reasons for that, one is the Roman Empire was prone to crucify people, so a person can have been crucified, but in R6 he is shown as crucified.”
L. Ron Hubbard, Class VIII course lecture #10 on the ship Apollo, October 3, 1968
http://www.rr.cistron.nl/xenu/quotes.htm
« Last Edit: September 18, 2010, 13:13 by Stutroup »
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2010, 13:09 »
Hubbard and Islam


If Scientology is compatible with Islam, why does their scripture mock Mohammed and the Kaaba at Mecca?

“It's an enormous stone hanging suspended in the middle of a room, this is an incident called the Emanator by the way, and this thing is by the way the source of the Mohammedan Lodestone that they have hanging down there, that, eh, when Mohammed decided to be a good small-town booster in eh Kansas, Middle-East, or something of the sort. By the way, the only reason he mocked that thing up, is the trade wasn't good in his hometown. That's right. You read the life of Mohammed.
And he's got a black one and it sort of hung between the ceiling and the floor, I don't know, maybe they call it the Casbah or something or... Anyway, anyway, that thing is a mockup of the Emanator! The Emanator is bright, not black. And so, your volunteer, who insists on a sightseeing trip, goes in and this thing is standing in the middle of the room, and it's going 'wong wong wong wong wong' and he says: "Isn't that pretty?". It sure is, and then he says "Mmmgrmrm ponk" Why, I'll tell you, they cart him from there, and they take him in and they do a transposition of beingness.”
Hubbard lecture, "Whats wrong with This Universe: A Working Package for the Auditor" On 9 Dec 1952

http://www.rr.cistron.nl/xenu/quotes.htm


((Next up, Buddhism))
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2010, 13:12 »
Hubbard and Buddhism


“Hubbard sometimes identified himself with Maitreya (Metteya in Pali), a prophesied Buddha of the future. This identification is made most strongly in his 1955–1956 poem 'Hymn of Asia,'* which begins with the line 'Am I Metteyya?' and emphasizes certain traits of Hubbard that the editors of the publication said matched traits predicted by the 'Metteya Legend.”**
* http://wikileaks.org/wiki/Scientology_cult_Hymn_of_Asia
** http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientology_and_other_religions#Religious_compatibility

Part of this poem follows:
"Everywhere you are
I can be addressed
But in your temples best
Address me and you address
Lord Buddha
And you then address
Meitreya."

The basic tenants of Buddhism are the Four Noble Truths, the Five Precepts and the Eightfold Path.  Scientology's founder demands the departure from many of these basic principles.
http://www.religioustolerance.org/buddhism1.htm (used as a basic overview)

The principle of equality:
"A truly Suppressive Person or group has no rights of any kind and actions taken against them are not punishable."
- L. Ron Hubbard, Hubbard Communications Office Policy Letter, 1 March 1965, HCO (Division 1) "Ethics, Suppressive Acts, Suppression of Scientology and Scientologists"

The principle of reciprocity:
"ENEMY SP Order. Fair game. May be deprived of property or injured by any means by any Scientologist without any discipline of the Scientologist. May be tricked, sued or lied to or destroyed."
- L. Ron Hubbard, Hubbard Communications Office Policy Letter, 18 October 1967
[SP = Suppressive Person a.k.a. critic of Scientology]

"THE ONLY WAY YOU CAN CONTROL PEOPLE IS TO LIE TO THEM. You can write that down in your book in great big letters. The only way you can control anybody is to lie to them." - L. Ron Hubbard, "Off the Time Track," lecture of June 1952, excerpted in JOURNAL OF SCIENTOLOGY issue 18-G, reprinted in TECHNICAL VOLUMES OF DIANETICS & SCIENTOLOGY, vol. 1, p. 418

These are but a few instances of Scientology's scriptures mandating lies, deception, and inequality of human beings. Many more examples are easily found on the Internet.
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2010, 13:15 »
Hubbard and Satanism (Crowley)

This alone would be pages upon pages of information.  There was too much information available to put into a simple tri-fold flier, and I regret not saving more information and references for it.  This is what remains:


L. Ron Hubbard's association with Aleister Crowley and John Whiteside Parsons began in 1946.

Parsons write to Crowley at the beginning of 1946. "He (Hubbard) is a gentleman, red hair, green eyes, honest and intelligent and we have become great friends. Although he has no formal training in magic he has an extraordinary amount of experience and understanding in the field. Ron appears to have some sort of highly developed astral vision. He describes his angel as a beautiful winged woman with red hair whom he calls the Empress and who has guided him through his life and saved him many times." He concluded almost ecstatically, "He is in complete accord with our own principles. I have found a staunch companion and comrade in Ron.”
http://www.lermanet.com/scientologynews/crowley-hubbard-666.htm

Hubbard ripped off many of the things which he learned from his time with Crowley and Parsons, and incorporated it into the higher levels of Scientology.

“What he did, reaily, was take bits and pieces from other people and put them together in a blender and stir them all up --- and out came Dianetics®! All the examples in the book --- some 200 "real-life experiences" --- were just the result of his obsessions with abortions and unconscious states... In fact, the vast majority of those incidents were invented off the top of his head. The rest stem from his own secret life, which was deeply involved in the occult and black-magic.”
http://www.ronthenut.org/antichri.htm
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ethercat

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2010, 11:31 »
Some of scientology's basic "tenets" (if you could call them that) are diametrically opposed to those of other religions that they claim compatibility with. 

For instance, the belief in past and future lives.  In Christianity, when you die, you are not reborn on earth, but go to heaven (or hell, or purgatory) - you do not come back to earth again and again in different bodies.  And of course, the practice of occultism is regarded by Christians as wrong, yet is touted by Hubbard as something which can be attained once one reaches the OT levels (going exterior, controlling MEST, ect) and is used a lure to get people who are dissatisfied with mainstream religions into scientology.

And really, come to think of it, what (real and/or other) religion claims to be, or even concerns themselves with being, compatible with other religions?  I can't think of any.   M-|V|-M
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2010, 13:00 »
There's way too much to ever fit into a single flier!  Well, I guess it's possible but it would require like 6px font and a 4800dpi printer ....

About Satanism alone, I found enough to fill maybe two pages with just quotes:
Things like how Hubbard started trying to take things over
Or he started trying too hard with the sexual side of Satanism (using it to seduce women, etc.)

If everything that countered each of those four religions was discussed in a single publication, it would surely be way too tl;dr.

Besides all that, I'm sure his involvement with Satanism would be enough to put off most Christians, even if Hubbard HAD professed Christ and incorporated Christianity.  So would his claim to be the reincarnation of Buddha.

His blasphemy of Jesus is enough to put off Muslims, who believe Jesus was a prophet -- not the Messiah, but still they respect his teachings a great deal.

Basically, even the few points made in the flier (what I pasted above) are enough to close a loop and show not only his disregard for religions, but also his incorporation of different religions into Scientology, his thirst for power (trying to set himself as the highest power in Buddhism: the Buddha!, attempting to displace Crowley or at least pull off his own contingent of followers, etc.), and his general insanity.
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ethercat

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2010, 13:45 »
I wasn't suggesting you expand upon the flyer, just offering more talking points for this thread.   :)

And thanks for doing all that research!   :-*
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mefree

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2010, 15:30 »
Quote
I wasn't suggesting you expand upon the flyer, just offering more talking points for this thread.
I don't believe that is what he meant. I think it was just a general statement about how the flyer could have been a mega-document with all available information.

Anyhow, back on topic....

Hubbard generally maligned other belief systems. Was Hubbard a malignant narcissist?

Some food for thought:
http://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/malignant-self-love/narcissistic-personality-disorder-npd-definition/menu-id-1471/
http://narcissists-suck.blogspot.com/2009/02/red-flag-vandalizes-others-images.html
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2010, 18:49 »
I wasn't suggesting you expand upon the flyer, just offering more talking points for this thread.   :)

Oh, I know :) I was merely lamenting that it can't all fit :P
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ethercat

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2010, 18:39 »
If you'd like to expand it into a longer piece, we can add it to the site as an article or page of its own, linked from the www part

 ||||9000||||
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mefree

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2011, 20:12 »
Quote
I wasn't suggesting you expand upon the flyer, just offering more talking points for this thread.
I don't believe that is what he meant. I think it was just a general statement about how the flyer could have been a mega-document with all available information.

Anyhow, back on topic....

Hubbard generally maligned other belief systems. Was Hubbard a malignant narcissist?

Some food for thought:
http://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/malignant-self-love/narcissistic-personality-disorder-npd-definition/menu-id-1471/
http://narcissists-suck.blogspot.com/2009/02/red-flag-vandalizes-others-images.html

When I originally posted this, I was unaware of this paper by Jodi Lane and Stephen Kent:

Quote
MALIGNANT NARCISSISM, L. RON HUBBARD, AND SCIENTOLOGY’S POLICIES OF NARCISSISTIC RAGE
ABSTRACT
In this article, we argue that Scientology’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, likely presented a personality disorder known as malignant narcissism, and then we establish that this disorder probably contributed to his creation of organizational policies against perceived enemies that reflected his narcissistic rage. We illustrate our argument by discussing Hubbard’s creation of an internal Scientology organization called the Guardian’s Office, which carried out a sustained and covert attack against a Scientology critic, Paulette Cooper. This attack, and the Scientology policies that Hubbard created to ‘handle’ critics like her, demonstrate how Hubbard translated narcissistic rage into organizational policies that loyal members enacted on his behalf. By using psychological insights about the leader’s personality, and then showing how that personality translated into socially deviant and sometimes criminal policies and actions by his organization, we hope to encourage criminologists to examine other groups by applying similar theories.

http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~skent/Linkedfiles/Lane-Kent_HubbardsNarcissism_EN_December08-2008.pdf
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2011, 16:46 »
Sorry for the delay in reply.  I've been a hair sidetracked lately.

If you'd like to expand it into a longer piece, we can add it to the site as an article or page of its own, linked from the www part

 ||||9000||||

I think I had about exhausted the most direct information for Buddhism.  I think LRH learned just enough about philosophies in rising and prominent popularity so he could exploit things from them. How do I know just enough?  Well, if he had actually studies Buddhism he wouldn't try to call himself the reincarnated Buddha (Maitreya) yet still mandate such harsh treatment of others.
edit: I think the general precepts of Buddhism could be easily expanded as well. Maybe that will also be a later task for me to complete as well :)

As far as Islam, I've quoted everything I can find referenced from Hubbard's writings and recordings.  And as I've mentioned, Islam regards the historic Jesus as a prophet, so anything discrediting him (such as the claims of pedophilia or his alleged rage problems) would also be considerable off-putting. 

However, I feel there's still a lot of possible research that can be done about his relationship with Judeo-Christian philosophies.  I haven't touched the Ten Commandments, Levitical laws, Jesus' mandates of interpersonal treatment, precepts set in place by the Apostles, etc.

If work is wanted, this examination of Scientology's claimed religious compatibility could potentially grow into a spiderwork detailing just about any aspect of any major categorical religion.  I'll be happy to chip away a little at a time, but I would also appreciate some help if anyone finds anything quotable.

Currently I'm working on a revision on Hubbard's association with the Occult (it will be a renamed section about Satanism, since I've learned that Crowley was a much more diverse person than many Crowley-Hubbard references point out).  So far, I've included some brief descriptions of exactly Crowley's and Parsons's associations with each other for background as well as some very direct examples of how OTO and some other dark magic(k) principles have been incorporated into Dianetics, and eventually Scientology.

Quote
I wasn't suggesting you expand upon the flyer, just offering more talking points for this thread.
I don't believe that is what he meant. I think it was just a general statement about how the flyer could have been a mega-document with all available information.

Anyhow, back on topic....

Hubbard generally maligned other belief systems. Was Hubbard a malignant narcissist?

Some food for thought:
http://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/malignant-self-love/narcissistic-personality-disorder-npd-definition/menu-id-1471/
http://narcissists-suck.blogspot.com/2009/02/red-flag-vandalizes-others-images.html

When I originally posted this, I was unaware of this paper by Jodi Lane and Stephen Kent:

Quote
MALIGNANT NARCISSISM, L. RON HUBBARD, AND SCIENTOLOGY’S POLICIES OF NARCISSISTIC RAGE
ABSTRACT
In this article, we argue that Scientology’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, likely presented a personality disorder known as malignant narcissism, and then we establish that this disorder probably contributed to his creation of organizational policies against perceived enemies that reflected his narcissistic rage. We illustrate our argument by discussing Hubbard’s creation of an internal Scientology organization called the Guardian’s Office, which carried out a sustained and covert attack against a Scientology critic, Paulette Cooper. This attack, and the Scientology policies that Hubbard created to ‘handle’ critics like her, demonstrate how Hubbard translated narcissistic rage into organizational policies that loyal members enacted on his behalf. By using psychological insights about the leader’s personality, and then showing how that personality translated into socially deviant and sometimes criminal policies and actions by his organization, we hope to encourage criminologists to examine other groups by applying similar theories.

http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~skent/Linkedfiles/Lane-Kent_HubbardsNarcissism_EN_December08-2008.pdf

Erm ... I think this may be something that opens another, and very large, can of worms for another research project :)
« Last Edit: April 30, 2011, 16:59 by Stutroup »
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2011, 19:35 »
Hubbard: The Dark Arts and Occultism
(Satanism, take 2)

Quote
“The magical cults of the 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th centuries in the Middle East were fascinating. The only modern work that has anything to do with them is a trifle wild in spots, but is a fascinating work in itself, and that's the work of Aleister Crowley – the late Aleister Crowley – my very good friend.”
   L. Ron Hubbard, Philidelphia Doctorate Course, Lecture 18, “Conditions of Space-Time-Energy.”

During the 1940s, L. Ron Hubbard developed a relationship with John Whiteside “Jack” Parsons, mainly pivoting around their curiosities in the Dark Arts.  Parsons was appointed by Crowley to lead the Agape Lodge, Thelemic Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO) [1].  Although Crowley may not have been a Satanist, it is possible that some of the philosophies have influenced his writings and leadership in OTO [2]. Regardless, the association has been indelibly made.  OTO, however, is an Occultic group based on ancient traditions, and possibly originally structured around some traditions of Freemasonry.  Crowley re-centered OTO around the Law of Thelema: “Do as though wilt shall be the whole of the law,” and “Love is the law, love under will.” [1]

Quote
“Crowley’s philosophy takes a bit from here and a bit from there ... but ... he was more a Satanist than anything else. ‘I serve my great Master Satan’, he wrote in one of his franker confessions, ‘and that august Council composed of Beelzebub, Lucifuge, Asmodeus, Belphegor, Baal, Adrammelech, Lilith and Nahema.’”

Crowley wrote of being the servant of Satan, “the Devil, our Lord … whose number of magick is 666, the seal of his servant the Beast” in his ritual for the Attainment of Knowledge and Conversation of his Holy Guardian Angel (Shaitan-Aiwaz). Kenneth Grant, another student of Crowley, wrote that: “this whole ritual is an invocation of Shaitan (Satan) or Set”. It is easy to see how The Great Beast 666 gained the reputation as a Satanist and hardcore anti-Christian. [2]


Parsons wrote to Crowley at the beginning of 1946: "He (Hubbard) is a gentleman, red hair, green eyes, honest and intelligent and we have become great friends. Although he has no formal training in magic he has an extraordinary amount of experience and understanding in the field. Ron appears to have some sort of highly developed astral vision. He describes his angel as a beautiful winged woman with red hair whom he calls the Empress and who has guided him through his life and saved him many times." He concluded almost ecstatically, "He is in complete accord with our own principles. I have found a staunch companion and comrade in Ron.” [8]

Before his departure from exploring OTO., Hubbard had even managed to influence Parsons' own methods and rituals. Crowley, “studied their correspondence and found their rituals to be contemptible and a bit outside normative OTO practise. Crowley mentioned to several friends that Parsons had fallen in with a conniving buffoon, but at no point moved to stop him.” Before he left, Hubbard allegedly stole some secret OTO documents from Parsons. [3]

Another aspect of OTO is the incorporation of Gnosticism [1].  The Gnostic Gospels are a set of early Christian books with a philosophy differing sometimes greatly from the Christian New Testament.  Gnosticism teaches that salvation lies not only in worship, but also in meditation leading to the freedom of the soul from the material world [5, 6].   Hubbard embraced the principles of Gnosticism while participating in OTO, and much of this found its way into Scientology later on.

Quote
“He, (emphasis-Parsons) considered that Ron had great magical potential and took the risk of breaking his solemn oath of secrecy to acquaint Ron with some of the O. T. O. rituals. … Nevertheless, Parsons clearly remained convinced that Ron possessed exceptional powers. … Parsons wrote to his 'Most Beloved Father' (Emphasis – his term for Aleister Crowley) to acquaint him with events: 'About three months ago I met Captain L. Ron Hubbard. … Although he has no formal training in Magick, he has an extraordinary amount of experience and understanding in the field. From some of his experiences I deduced that he is in direct touch with some higher intelligence, possibly his Guardian Angel. … He is the most Thelemic person I have ever met and is in complete accord with our own principles.”
   Russel Miller, Bare-Faced Messiah: the True Story of L. Ron Hubbard, 1987 pp. 117-118 [7]

Hubbard raced into a position of power with Parsons in OTO, practicing the occult and sexual magick. During this time, Hubbard came into possession of Crowley's “Book of Thoth” and the “Book of Thoth Tarot Card Deck,” both of which contained information and symbolism later used in Scientology. Hubbard's time with Parsons is also where he met Sara Northrop, who would leave Parsons to later become Hubbard's second wife [7]. 

In a matter of a few short years, Hubbard's grabs at money and power had gained him the contempt of Crowley and other leaders of the organization.  Hubbard had attempted the Moonchild ritual, inciting Crowley's anger, and later embezzles a large sum of money to purchase a yacht for himself and his girlfriend [8].

Before his departure from exploring OTO., Hubbard had even managed to influence Parsons' own methods and rituals. Crowley, “studied their correspondence and found their rituals to be contemptible and a bit outside normative OTO practise. Crowley mentioned to several friends that Parsons had fallen in with a conniving buffoon, but at no point moved to stop him.” Before he left, Hubbard allegedly stole some secret OTO documents from Parsons [3].

Ultimately Hubbard adapted many concepts from OTO into Scientology:
“Now, Scientology is wont to use some of the out-of-body texts stolen from Parsons, and use both concepts and terms they lifted directly from the OTO, changing Teitan to Thetan, stealing Crowley's ideas of combining Will and Magick and Scientific Method in order to discover magical processes. Crowley wrote some interesting items on therapeutizing the soul, but did not believe it seems that anyone should guide the individual more than that individual and would have balked strongly before allowing case managers to dominate a person's spiritual progression.[3]

OTO, being structured after Freemasonry, has tiers called degrees [1]. In Scientology, there are several levels of development, ranging from being “pre-clear” (PC), basically an initiate into the organization undergoing basic indoctrination and training, then on to the Operating Thetan (OT) levels.

Further proof that Scientology is largely a re-branding of OTO is that it, “embraces gnosticism. Its doctrines are gnostic, and it uses gnostic writings to support its own ideas. … Scientology is clearly gnostic, by its own admission and by the similarities to its own and gnostic teachings. Once again, ideas Hubbard declares to be new and discovered by him, are shown to be derived from old and widespread teachings in existence long before he came along [4].”

Hubbard placed himself over Scientology as the only source of spiritual freedom, something that the Gnostic texts call the “celestial mediator.” In issue 93 of the Scientology magazine “Advance!”, Hubbard claimed, “"The mystery of this universe... has been, as far as its track is concerned, completely occluded. No one has ever been able to make any breakthrough and come off with it and know what happened... I finally was able to make a breakthrough which brought people through the zone safely [4]."  But the similarities do not end there.

Scientology's famed body thetans, or spirits attached to people and causing their problems, are not something discovered by Hubbard or specific to Scientology.  In fact, the exact concept is from the writings of Valentinus, an early Christian Gnostic:
“"For many spirits dwell in it [the body] and do not permit it to be pure; each of them brings to fruition its own works, and they treat it abusively by means of unseemly desires. To me it seems that the heart suffers in much the same way as an inn: for it has holes and trenches dug in it and is often filled with filth by men who live there licentiously and have no regard for the place because it belongs to another [4]."

The connections to the Occult weren't even hidden in the early years of the establishment of Scientology: “... in the first publication of dianetics in 'Astounding Science Fiction', Hubbard in explaining how he did his 'research' into what the mind was doing, says he used 'automatic writing, speaking and clairvoyance' to discover what the mind's memory banks were doing [4, 9].  Now, Scientology uses the E-Meter during auditing, but it was not accepted in practice until 1958, nearly a decade later [10].

Thus it is clearly established that l. Ron Hubbard not only used some inspiration from OTO, Dark Arts, and Gnosticism, in the establishment of Scientology, it also becomes apparent that many concept, ideas, and practices are being used but with different names.


Quote
“What he did, really, was take bits and pieces from other people and put them together in a blender and stir them all up --- and out came Dianetics®! All the examples in the book --- some 200 "real-life experiences" --- were just the result of his obsessions with abortions and unconscious states... In fact, the vast majority of those incidents were invented off the top of his head. The rest stem from his own secret life, which was deeply involved in the occult and black-magic.” [11]


[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordo_Templi_Orientis

[2] http://occultlibrary.info/was-aleister-crowley-a-satanist/

[3] http://www.ezlink.com/~perry/CoS/Theology/crowley3.htm

[4] http://www.mt.net/~watcher/crowleyhubbard.html

[5] http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/gnostics.html

[6] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnostic_Gospels

[7] http://www.lermanet.com/scientology-and-occult/

[8] http://www.lermanet.com/scientologynews/crowley-hubbard-666.htm

[9] L. Ron Hubbard, "Dianetics: Evolution of a Science", Astounding Science Fiction, May 1950 p. 66

[10] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-meter#History

[11] http://www.ronthenut.org/antichri.htm
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ethercat

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2011, 09:11 »
My goodness, Stu!  You've been busy!  It will take me a little while to get through all this, but thank you VERY much for the effort. 

 \^^/

Sorry for the delay in reply.  I've been a hair sidetracked lately.

No problem at all.  I think we've all been sidetracked lately.  Plus, spring fever has hit!  ^*-->|
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Stutroup

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2011, 19:44 »
Take two on Buddhism is coming soon.

(I found some fun commentary here:
http://newbuddhist.com/discussion/3700/buddhism-and-scientology/p1

And some fun pre-Anonymous *wink wink to all out there* banter on this forum:
http://www.topix.com/forum/religion/scientology/T43BA16P8UNL68FVP)

But I need some eventual help!  For the flier version and this longer one, I need a link to replace the Wikileaks reference.  Apparently the leaked text of the Hymn of Asia is only the introduction, and not the poem itself. For now I have linked some other sources, but people deserve something more substantial.  Granted, it's difficult to find the full text of the poem, but still: if it's out there (on the Internet, not one of the used copies on Amazon  (*ouo*), I'd like to find it.

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Intelligence

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2011, 01:24 »
This is an awesome thread that I've only had a chance to glace at: will read more when time permits.
I am writing far more than I read right now; just too busy, with countless irons in the hot roasting Cult Fire; ready for the imminent BRANDING of GUILTY! Although time is on our side, my target is to cause as much battle for the Cult as possible, in as short amount of time as possible.

My mind races, at times, and I struggle with transcribing my thoughts onto the screen fast enough. I treat each day as if it were my last, but begin each day with a warm smile of gratefulness to all who have stood by my side, with encouragement and Love. Thank you ALL:-):-):-)

.
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mefree

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Re: Hubbard's take on other religions ...
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2011, 19:48 »
Some additional information on this topic found in this thread on WWP.

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/threads/scientology-magazines.18634/page-7#post-1801024
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