Author Topic: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?  (Read 8620 times)

Offline AnonLover

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2015, 17:30 »
While the DoD did a poor job of vetting, the dox reveal that they had a hard time overcoming lots of roadblocks. Which is good, they didn't just skate thru the process. See my newly posted document inventory for more details: https://whyweprotest.net/threads/us-army-catches-scientology-%E2%80%98detox%E2%80%99-study-foia-request-reveals.130212/#post-2555592

Offline ethercat

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2015, 17:50 »
I'm glad to see this issue getting much needed attention, but unfortunately this is not the only "quack" study funded by the United States government:

Quote from: reason.com
The Alternative Medicine Racket: How the Feds Fund Quacks
The NIH has spent $5.5 billion on bringing quackery—from faith healing to homeopathy—right into the heart of the American medical establishment.

Todd Krainin | September 4, 2015

Behind the dubious medical claims of Dr. Mehmet Oz and Deepak Chopra is a decades-long strategy to promote alternative medicine to the American public. Twenty-three years ago, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) began to investigate a wide variety of unconventional medical practices from around the world. Five-and-a-half billion dollars later, the NIH has found no cures for disease. But it has succeeded in bringing every kind of quackery—from faith healing to homeopathy—out of the shadows and into the heart of the American medical establishment.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), a part of the NIH, is largely the brainchild of a single person. In the 1980s, Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) was convinced that bee pollen extract cured his hay fever. As the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee overseeing NIH funding, Harkin set aside $2 million to establish the NCCIH's forerunner, the Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM). Senator Harkin did not respond to multiple requests to participate in this story.

The OAM's stated mission was to investigate the medical value of alternative therapies. Despite its minuscule budget, its mandate was massive. Almost any kind of unusual therapy could be considered "alternative", spanning dozens of widely differing cultural traditions and historical eras. Everything from homeopathic remedies for arthritis to acupuncture for back pain to remote prayer for HIV/AIDS to coffee enemas for fighting cancer was in its purview.
...

Quote from: The Skeptic's Dictionary
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
formerly
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
formerly
Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM)


The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), formerly The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), formerly the Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM), is a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIH has played an important role in improving the health of U.S. citizens for over a century. It traces its roots to 1887 with the creation of the Laboratory of Hygiene at the Marine Hospital in Staten Island, New York, for research in cholera and other infectious diseases. Like many other evidence-based programs under government control, the NIH has been politicized in the name of consumer protection.*

From 1991 until his retirement on January 3, 2015, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA) was a main figure on the appropriations subcommittee in charge of the NIH. In 1992 Harkin slipped a line in the report accompanying the NIH appropriations bill that created the NIH Office of Alternative Medicine with $1 million in seed money. In 1999 President Clinton signed into law an appropriations bill that gave the OAM a new name--The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine--and pumped up its budget to $50 million a year so it could establish a new National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at Bastyr University, a naturopathic college outside of Seattle.* In 2013, this outfit became the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health as mandated in the omnibus budget measure signed by President Obama.

Unfortunately, the name changes do not represent progress. Rather they indicate the success of non-scientific and anti-scientific health practitioners in their effort to co-opt science-based medicine and drive the agenda of a branch of the NIH that never should have been established in the first place. What the name change represents is the continued insult to science-based medicine by telling the world that the NIH does not care what the scientific consensus is on any medical treatments. If enough people can be duped into thinking they can cure their cancer by sprinkling turmeric on their graviola then the NIH will give the dupers money to test the safety and efficacy of a treatment with zero plausibility. Swell.
...

more at the links above.  Letter/email writers might find some allies to help publicize this Narconon scandal in some of the links from the 2nd page.  Comments are still open on the first, I believe.
   Narconon Reviews
   Independent Reviews of the Narconon Drug Rehab Programs
   Answers to Frequently Asked But Seldom Answered Questions

Offline mefree

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2015, 08:45 »
While the DoD did a poor job of vetting, the dox reveal that they had a hard time overcoming lots of roadblocks. Which is good, they didn't just skate thru the process. See my newly posted document inventory for more details: https://whyweprotest.net/threads/us-army-catches-scientology-%E2%80%98detox%E2%80%99-study-foia-request-reveals.130212/#post-2555592

Thanks for linking, AnonLover. Camo man and others have added some contacts for emails/letter writing there!

Quote
Human Research Protection Office (HRPO)

http://mrmc.amedd.army.mil/index.cfm?pageid=research_protections.hrpo

Office of Research Protections (ORP)

The Office of Research Protections (ORP) ensures that USAMRMC conducted, contracted, sponsored, supported or managed research and U.S. Army Medical Command investigations involving human subjects, human anatomical substances or animals are conducted in accordance with Federal, DoD, Army, USAMRMC, and international regulatory requirements.

http://mrmc.amedd.army.mil/index.cfm?pageid=research_protections.overview

Contact the Office of Research Protections

http://mrmc.amedd.army.mil/index.cfm?pageid=research_protections.contact_orp
Director, Office of Research Protections

Phone: (301) 619-7550
Email: USArmy.Detrick.MEDCOM-USAMRMC.Other.HRPO@mail.mil
For Adverse Event Issues:

    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
    ATTN: MCMR-RP
    810 Schreider Street
    Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5000
    Phone: (301) 619-2165 (DSN 343)
    Fax: (301) 619-7803 (DSN 343)

Human Research Protection Office


Chief, Human Subjects Protection Review


    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
    ATTN: MCMR-RPH
    810 Schreider Street
    Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5000
    Phone: (301) 619-7550
    Fax: (301) 619-7803 (DSN 343)
    Email: USArmy.Detrick.MEDCOM-USAMRMC.Other.HRPO@mail.mil

Clinical Investigation Regulatory Office

Director, Clinical Investigation Regulatory Office


    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
    ATTN: MCMR-RPC
    810 Schreider Street
    Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5000
    Phone: (301) 619-6192
    Fax: (301) 619-4165 (DSN 343)
    Email: USArmy.Detrick.MEDCOM-USAMRMC.Other.CIRO@mail.mil

Institutional Review Board Office

Director, Institutional Review Board Office


    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
    ATTN: MCMR-RPI
    810 Schreider Street
    Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5000
    Phone: (301) 619-2166
    Fax: (301) 619-4165 (DSN 343)
    Email: USArmy.Detrick.MEDCOM-USAMRMC.Other.IRB-Office@mail.mil
https://whyweprotest.net/threads/us-army-catches-scientology-%E2%80%98detox%E2%80%99-study-foia-request-reveals.130212/#post-2555592
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama

Offline BigBeard

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2015, 10:57 »
The VA would also be a good place to poon. They have a presentation on CDMRP from back when at:
http://www1.va.gov/RAC-GWVI/docs/Minutes_and_Agendas/Minutes_June2010_AppendixA_Presentation9.pdf

One of the things in the presentation that struck me was on a slide related to studies on "Gulf War Illness" that said there would be:

Quote
Competitive selection and peer review to identify research with the highest technical merit and military value.

Which is probably why $cientology's detox program did NOT make the cut with the VA. Looking at the list of research the VA is funding in the 2013 Annual Report to Congress at: http://www.research.va.gov/topics/gulfwar.cfm I don't see the $cientology detox scam listed at all. In fact, the only mention is in the DOD funded projects listed in 'Appendix A' as "DOD-199 Gulf War Illness: Evaluation of an Innovative Detoxification Program".

So it looks like the VA didn't buy into this one at all, but DOD did. Even so, I think some poons to the VA asking them to look into what's being done to our veterans by this $cientology scam are in order.

BigBeard
BigBeard

Offline AnonLover

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2015, 11:48 »
Even so, I think some poons to the VA asking them to look into what's being done to our veterans by this $cientology scam are in order.

The critical thing to worry about right now is preventing the current program from getting more DOD funding. I'm dox dumping my research into targeting that angle on the WWP thread with this goal in mind:

1. Write an Open Letter to the CDMRP Commanding General and GWIRP IP Members I just identified here as being the critical bottleneck of funding decisions: https://whyweprotest.net/threads/us-army-catches-scientology-%E2%80%98detox%E2%80%99-study-foia-request-reveals.130212/#post-2555653

(Possibly add whatever congress critter committee has a role in these things. I don't know who that is ATM)

2. In that letter, request that all future funding be denied unless certain issues are addressed. And identify a short ammo list of the falsehoods, misrepresentations, major problems and oversights in the original proposal/protocol and other FOIA dox.

3. Post that Open Letter on change.org as a petition and spread it far and wide.

4. Harpoon veterans groups, including the VA, to also support and promote the change.org petition.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:55 by AnonLover »

Offline mefree

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #25 on: September 12, 2015, 12:24 »
The critical thing to worry about right now is preventing the current program from getting more DOD funding. I'm dox dumping my research into targeting that angle on the WWP thread with this goal in mind:

1. Write an Open Letter to the CDMRP Commanding General and GWIRP IP Members I just identified here as being the critical bottleneck of funding decisions: https://whyweprotest.net/threads/us-army-catches-scientology-%E2%80%98detox%E2%80%99-study-foia-request-reveals.130212/#post-2555653

(Possibly add whatever congress critter committee has a role in these things. I don't know who that is ATM)

2. In that letter, request that all future funding be denied unless certain issues are addressed. And identify a short ammo list of the falsehoods, misrepresentations, major problems and oversights in the original proposal/protocol and other FOIA dox.

3. Post that Open Letter on change.org as a petition and spread it far and wide.

4. Harpoon veterans groups, including the VA, to also support and promote the change.org petition.

That's a great plan.

Since there is an organization interested in the potential for adverse events during Army Medical Research at HRPO, some attention in that direction should be given, with an emphasis on the trend of adverse events (deaths) at Narconon Arrowhead and Patrick Desmond's death at NNGA.

That's not directly related to the funding, but just as important, IMO. 
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama

Offline AnonLover

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #26 on: September 12, 2015, 12:58 »
Ooo... good point 'free. That should most definitely be included in the "short ammo list" of major issues of concern re: why no further funding show be given.

Offline mefree

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2015, 14:34 »
 ;)
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama

Offline AnonLover

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2015, 16:52 »
New situation room subforum setup for harpooning the next round of funding:
https://whyweprotest.net/forums/us-army-foia-scientology.451/

Older threads will be moved into there eventually.

Offline AnonLover

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Re: DOD funding research into Scientology detox programs?
« Reply #29 on: September 19, 2015, 13:31 »
Bump for updates!

There is a bunch more work done over on WWP as far as digging into the FOIA dox on this study, debunking that shi- and preparing future ammo for harpooning additional funding on this front.

I've also filed a few more related FOIA requests in pursuit of the loose ends in my original disclosure. You can see those here: https://www.muckrock.com/tags/clinical-trial/