Author Topic: Some Atlanta org history  (Read 2666 times)

Offline ethercat

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Some Atlanta org history
« on: January 15, 2012, 11:14 »
I ran across this bit of history of Atlanta-based scientology from Greg and Debra Barnes on Mark Bunker's blog.  Posting it here for any history-buffs who might be reading.

Greg and Debra Barnes were declared for pointing out wrongs (where have we heard that before?) and wanting them fixed.

http://www.xenutv.com/blog/?cat=176

Quote
Greg and Debra Barnes
Clearwater, Florida 33756

May 9th, 1999

Contributions of Greg and Debra Barnes:

Was awarded the #3 top street bookseller in the US in 1980.

Assisted Dissem org in getting the Tony Hichman interview put on cable TV stations in Dallas in 1984. Went and got several stations to put the interview on. Dallas Texas

Assisted the then Mission in Atlanta with regging and recruitment of staff. I regged an estimated 60-70 thousand dollars and got people moving onto auditing and training who were not.

When mission was becoming org we donated $500.00 to furnish the LRH office and our donation made the project happen. 1984-90

During the Portland trial we paid the plane ticket for someone to go and represent us.

1986, started WISE consulting company Atlanta Georgia and put over 70 doctors onto the bridge and some of these doctors staff joined mission staff. Many became Patrons and are still active today. These doctors spent in excess of $1 million with the church not to mention the others that they brought in that we don’t know about. We paid over 250,000 in royalties to WISE over a 4 year period and introduced LRH admin tech to over 300 doctors. Many of our doctors did L’s at Flag and we sent doctors into orgs in Ohio,Minneapolis and Atlanta and LA Day. Will provide names if desired.

Spoke at a public forum in Gwinette County Georgia against having a psych hospital put in. We went twice and Dwight Matheny who ran the CCHR Chapter in Atlanta can attest to this. 1989-90

Did radio talk show Media on Dianetics in 1986-87, estimate that we did 10-15 talk shows that got very good results.

Became Life time members of IAS right after the IAS was formed.

Moved to Dallas in 1990 and became active with OT committee and was on training.

snippety...  read Mark's site for more...

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Offline skydog

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Re: Some Atlanta org history
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2012, 08:45 »
The Atlanta mission was thriving in the late seventies and early eighties.  As I recall, it was Peter and Doran Greene who started that mission along with another mission in Charlotte, NC. Peter was one of the original scientologists and a personal friend of LRH. He had a son, Eric, and Doran had a daughter who was killed/died in her twenties.  Both Peter and Doran were declared when the missions were taken over by Miscavige in the early eighties. Some of the people who were active then are still active now: Tom Davis, Dan Austin, Ron Marquis, Mary Reiser to name a few. Some other names that come to mind are Robin Conant, Dave Ouellete, Art Colliani, Debbie Hartzell.

Offline ethercat

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Re: Some Atlanta org history
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2012, 09:41 »
The Atlanta mission was thriving in the late seventies and early eighties.  As I recall, it was Peter and Doran Greene who started that mission along with another mission in Charlotte, NC. Peter was one of the original scientologists and a personal friend of LRH. He had a son, Eric, and Doran had a daughter who was killed/died in her twenties.  Both Peter and Doran were declared when the missions were taken over by Miscavige in the early eighties. Some of the people who were active then are still active now: Tom Davis, Dan Austin, Ron Marquis, Mary Reiser to name a few. Some other names that come to mind are Robin Conant, Dave Ouellete, Art Colliani, Debbie Hartzell.

Those were the days when I didn't even know what Scientology was.  Wonder what ever happened to the Greenes?

Those that have been involved since then have seen a lot of changes; I wonder if they ever think about the old days...  I wonder if they ever think about "what might have been" if they had made different choices in their lives...
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Offline skydog

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Re: Some Atlanta org history
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2012, 08:04 »
Peter Greene died in 1989, although declared, remaining a true believer. As far as the others, who knows what they are thinking. Thankfully, I never got too involved in any of the madness. Back then, no one knew about Xenu or the rest of the crap and progression through the ranks was motivated in large part to become one of the "inner circle" that knew the "truth". It was all a big mystery and like the little kids vs. big kids those in the know did not tell.

I have to laugh thinking about a conversation with my little sister and her telling me that it was all a big scam and that the reason the "enlightened few" never talked about the upper levels was because they were embarrassed about being scammed. Out of the mouths of babies . . . The reg at the time was Robin Conant, OT VII. He was married to a girl named Bridget. He got canned after it was discovered that he was skimming money. I briefly wondered why someone at that level would engage in criminal behavior but any doubts were dismissed with whatever explanation was given.

I can only imagine the level of paranoia that now exists within the organization. Everyone involved has to be wondering who is watching them as they are watching others knowing that anything said or done may result in an ethics assignment. If they go in to the local org or mission, they will be hounded for donations; if they stay away, they will be stalked until they return.

Offline ethercat

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Re: Some Atlanta org history
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2012, 09:42 »
Thanks for filling in some of the history, skydog.

I have to laugh thinking about a conversation with my little sister and her telling me that it was all a big scam and that the reason the "enlightened few" never talked about the upper levels was because they were embarrassed about being scammed. Out of the mouths of babies . . .

If you don't mind me asking, I'm curious how old your little sister was at the time?

When word of "Xenu" came out (Fishman hearing? was that the first public mention?), the OTs who had passed that level had to be even more embarrassed, that is, if they heard about it.  Embarrassment must have turned to anger, I suppose, as public derision increased, because any scientologists that I've seen who hear the word get very, very angry.

I'm glad you can laugh about it all now.   ;D
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Offline skydog

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Re: Some Atlanta org history
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2012, 07:21 »
At the time she would have been about sixteen or seventeen so she was not really a baby. She always was the one with brains in the family. :)

Offline mefree

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Re: Some Atlanta org history
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2012, 10:46 »
At the time she would have been about sixteen or seventeen so she was not really a baby. She always was the one with brains in the family. :)

She had a good head on her shoulders for sixteen!

Still, vulnerability to Scientology recruitment probably involves many factors and the indoctrination happens rather quickly, from what others have shared.
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama