Author Topic: [Google] Sandy Springs: Patience a virtue in zoning matters - Atlanta Journal Constitution  (Read 1582 times)

Offline News Thetan

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Sandy Springs: Patience a virtue in zoning matters - Atlanta Journal Constitution
23 October 2009, 9:02 pm



Sandy Springs: Patience a virtue in zoning matters

Atlanta Journal Constitution

This comes to mind after the Sandy Springs City Council deferred voting on a rezoning request by the Church of Scientology concerning a building at the ...



Source: scientology OR scientologist OR narconon OR miscavige OR criminon OR cchr OR freewinds - Google News

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Offline Stutroup

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Hm ... the article touches on things from an interesting angle.  Am I reading fatigue by the local media?

Nonetheless, some good points are made, as well as some jabs against the cult.  At the same time, I think there's a point that didn't need to be made, but it leads to the jabs.

Or maybe it's an encouragement to the people of Sandy Springs to be patient and keep at it.

the meat of it is this:

Quote
(I've spent a lot of time as a reporter sitting in city-level government meetings which dragged on for hours and longer) Democracy, as vital as it is, ain’t always pretty to witness. I felt like strangling the guy, but I’ll bet the judge would have sentenced me to 30 years over covering zoning meetings.

This comes to mind after the Sandy Springs City Council deferred voting on a rezoning request by the Church of Scientology concerning a building at the intersection of Roswell Road and Glenridge Drive. This will surface again in December, but has been in the works since last spring.

The average person doesn’t know how long it can take in governmental circles to get from “this might be a good idea” to the official “yes you can” from those occupying the seats of power. These matters are never decided quickly, and for good reason. Rezoning decisions need to be deliberated and filtered through several legal hurdles.

The objections to the Scientologists getting the building center on how that would affect traffic, but I’ll bet the creeped-out factor is also in play. I don’t think the average Sandy Springsteen could explain Scientology, but knows he doesn’t care for it.

What I know: It’s weird. Tom Cruise is a Scientologist, and he’s weird. Ditto John Travolta. Double-damn ditto Kirstie Alley.

...

So if you are among those, on either side, wishing for a rapid decision on this, take a deep breath. A resolution based on speed is rarely the best one.

...


Raven

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Whole article here:
I’m willing to bet most newspaper reporters logged time at public meetings where zoning decisions are discussed, debated and decided. While some may enjoy watching the wheels of parochial American democracy in action, I never did.

I understood what was decided in those rooms was important, but those aforementioned wheels can make an execrable noise when they turn. Many evenings I thought I had died and the zoning meeting I was sitting in was Hell.

The absolute nadir was when the Presidential Parkway was being debated. I was called in to cover an evening meeting. As the meeting lugged forward like an elephant soaked in Valium, and my deadline came hurtling at me at supersonic speed — I grabbed one of the principals.
What was the likely outcome, I asked? He told me, in effect, the group would take a nonbinding vote that would be passed along to a committee. That committee was under no compunction to agree with the vote, which didn’t matter because it had no juice.
And that was three hours of my life gone. Democracy, as vital as it is, ain’t always pretty to witness. I felt like strangling the guy, but I’ll bet the judge would have sentenced me to 30 years over covering zoning meetings.
This comes to mind after the Sandy Springs City Council deferred voting on a rezoning request by the Church of Scientology concerning a building at the intersection of Roswell Road and Glenridge Drive. This will surface again in December, but has been in the works since last spring.
The average person doesn’t know how long it can take in governmental circles to get from “this might be a good idea” to the official “yes you can” from those occupying the seats of power. These matters are never decided quickly, and for good reason. Rezoning decisions need to be deliberated and filtered through several legal hurdles.
The objections to the Scientologists getting the building center on how that would affect traffic, but I’ll bet the creeped-out factor is also in play. I don’t think the average Sandy Springsteen could explain Scientology, but knows he doesn’t care for it.
What I know: It’s weird. Tom Cruise is a Scientologist, and he’s weird. Ditto John Travolta. Double-damn ditto Kirstie Alley.
Oh, and the big office in New York City was originally built in 1912 for a group called The White Rats Club. That last nugget is included because I will likely never get to use the phrase “White Rats Club” again.
So if you are among those, on either side, wishing for a rapid decision on this, take a deep breath. A resolution based on speed is rarely the best one.
Or look at it this way — do you really want to be in line at your neighborhood bakery behind Kirstie Alley?
Jim Osterman lives in Sandy Springs.


I find this whole piece just very odd

Offline SocialTransparency

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 Sad fact. The local media is afraid to point out what the reality of the situation is. The local press craves a story on this issue, yet like buzzards, circles until someone or something else does its research for them. I find it a crying shame very few local Sandy Springs residents will come out and share his or her honest feelings about scientology and how they perceive it and its possible impact on their community. Has it gotten to the point within our democratic system, that we as citizens are afraid to speak our minds? What have you to fear? Every darned one of us knows this is far more than a zoning issue. It is both a moral and health of the community as a whole issue. When will more of you Sandy Springs residents stand up for your constitutional rights and express what is truly @ the heart of the matter here? You the citizen are depending way to much on a board of 7 people to come to a decision that will impact more than just some parking and traffic issue.