Author Topic: What's it all about?  (Read 5383 times)

Offline wynot

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What's it all about?
« on: March 27, 2009, 21:52 »
This is a speech I gave a few years back to a neo-pagan gathering:

Lisa McPherson was an apparently devout Scientologist who had
attained a state of 'Clear', signifying that scientology/dianetics had freed her of all possible mental aberrations. Lisa lived in Clearwater, Florida, which is the site of the world headquarters of the church of scientology. She worked for a Scientologist owned company as a bookeeper, and earned a salary of over $100,000 per year.

   Relatives and former friends said that Lisa had contacted them during the summer and fall of 1995, and hinted that she was thinking of leaving the church.

   On November 18, 1995, Lisa was involved in a minor automobile
accident. Though physically uninjured, she removed all her clothes, and began wandering down the street. The paramedics who had arrived on the scene grabbed her and wrapped her in a blanket, and took her to the nearest hospital for psychiatric observation. The parameds asked her why she was doing this, and she answered that she wanted help. Within a few minutes after her arrival at the hospital, several Scientologists showed up and removed her, telling hospital officials that her religion did not allow her to be treated by psychiatrists. Lisa apparently made no protest at her removal.

   Scientology has a term for members who begin exhibiting psychotic
behaviour; they are called PTS, or Potential Trouble Sources. Following rules for the treatment of such people laid down by founder L. Ron Hubbard, Lisa was locked in a room in the basement of the Fort Harrison Hotel, tied to a bed, and drugged with chloral-hydrate, a powerful hypnotic prescribed for her by a Scientologist doctor who never actually saw her while she was alive. She was kept watch over in shifts by members who were untrained in medical care, and who were not allowed to speak to her. She was seen a couple times by a doctor whose license to practice had been revoked by the state of Arizona for mis-use of prescription drugs.

   Logs written by the scientologists keeping watch over her show that she asked repeatedly to be let go, and refused food or water. They did try to force her to drink a concoction called Cal-Mag, a milkshake like drink made mostly of calcium and magnesium, both of which cause dehydration. After seventeen days, it became obvious to her keepers that she was sick to the point of death. She was placed in the back of a church van, and driven to a hospital twenty-five miles away, although there were four hospitals closer, where a scientologist Doctor declared her "Dead on arrival" on December 5, 1995. Her weight at the time of her death was 117 pounds; the paramedics who had helped her after the accident only 17 days before had reported her as a being a healthy 170. An autopsy was performed, and the attending Doctor stated that Lisa died of an embolism caused by dehydration and excessive bed rest.

 Scientology works like a lot of cults. The basic premise holds a promise of certainty, of a belief system that is supposedly 'scientifically proven',with a further promise of mystical powers.

   Originally, Hubbard called it Dianetics. He claimed that all mental and physical problems were caused by engrams, repressed memories from childhood and the womb, of painful events and misunderstood words and sentences. Through a process he called 'auditing', which was basically formalized freudian analysis, a person would be encouraged to remember all sorts of horrible things from the past; whether these memories were true or not was not terribly important. A prime tenet of scientology is "what is true is what's true for you". Hubbard claimed that by bringing up these memories in our minds, and then mentally blowing them away, all problems could be cured, and a person would become 'Clear'.

   At a large meeting in Los Angeles in 1951, Hubbard presented his first 'Clear' to the world. Supposedly, 'Clears' have perfect memory, and are able to communicate with anybody on any subject. Responding to questions from the audience, the young woman was unable to remember what she had for breakfast 2 years before, what was on page 247 of Hubbard's book Dianetics, and finally could not remember what color tie Hubbard was wearing when he turned his back to her. This appeared to be a devastating setback for Hubbard's claims, but it barely slowed him down. Hubbard continued publishing his claims for dianetics, and welcoming more and more people to auditing sessions. Eventually, when it became obvious that Dianetics did not solve anybody's problems (except Hubbard's financial ones), he began teaching that it was really awful things that happened in past lives that created all mankind's ills. And if you spend enough money for CoS auditing nowadays, you can learn that all your problems are caused by the souls of dead aliens trying to take over your body. In 1954(?), Hubbard incorporated dianetics as the Church of Scientology in an attempt to gain tax-free status.

   Pretty soon, Hubbard had people holding soup cans connected to ohmeters, and used as simplified lie detectors. He called them 'electro-psychometers, eventually shortened to just e-meters. Scientologists quickly learned how to make the needles on the meter swing however the auditor seemed to want, using techniques familiar to anyone who has played with bio-feedback devices. By making up past life stories, and claiming big wins and cognizance's, one could convince one's auditor, and oneself, that the e-meter worked, and that you were going clear. Anyone who has ever been hypnotized knows how easy it is to just go along with the hypnotist's suggestions in that state. It can be a really good feeling, and a person may want more of it.

   As Scientology grew larger, the money poured in. Hubbard still could not get tax-exempt status for his church. In the late 1950s, Scientology was investigated by the Food and Drug Administration because of their claims that usage of the e-meter could cure diseases, like cancer and seborrhea. This led to an investigation by the FDA, who eventually forced Hubbard to put a label on each e-meter sold, stating that it was not a therapeutic device, and forbade scientology from making medical claims for the device.This did not stop the church from making such claims, but it did force them to hide them behind a veil of pseudo-scientific gobble-de-goop.

   In the early 1960s, Hubbard bought an old cattle barge, renamed it the Freewinds, and took to the sea, with a makeshift navy he called 'The Sea Org', and a group of teenage girls whom he called his 'messengers'. Scientologists came from all over the world to be near the 'Source' of all knowledge. He exercised dictatorial powers, and would throw people overboard if they did anything which displeased him. One time he forced a six year old boy to spend two days in the anchor storage room, a dark and dirty place, without food, for an infraction of the rules.

   In the seventies, high Scientology management, led by Hubbard, planned a massive undercover operation against the United States government, code named Snow White. They began infiltrating offices of the FDA, the FBI, and the IRS, getting jobs as clerical and janitorial workers. Their mission was to steal, destroy, or alter any documents they could find which concerned Scientology. Eventually they were caught, and seven of them , including Hubbard's wife, served prison time. Hubbard was named an 'un-indicted co-conspirator', and spent the rest of his life in hiding.

   Since its inception, Scientology has maintained policies of SP Declares and disconnections. A disconnection is exactly what it sounds like; members are forced to sever all relations with family or friends who criticize the church. I learned of this first hand recently when a friend of nearly 20 years sent me a disconnection letter the day I picketed in front of his church. He also sent a diconnection letter to another friend who was even closer to him than me, merely because she would not give up her friendship with me.

   The SP Declare is what happens to people who leave the Church. They are declared Suppressive Persons, and their names distributed to all Scientology organizations. They may not receive Scientology services, and may be "tricked, lied to or utterly destroyed' by any Scientologist, without fear of punishment. The church maintains a special department, the Office of Special Affairs, or OSA, for 'handling' people who have left the church, or who have actively spoken out against the church and its practices. Their tactics include the use of private investigators assigned to find, or invent, crimes with which to blackmail those the church considers enemies.

   For years, the church of scientology has gotten away with such practices because they have an enormous amount of money stockpiled, and can intimidate individuals who do not believe they have a chance against such a powerful organisation. Reporters who tried to investigate the church found themselves the focus of private investigators, writers who wrote about the church found their publishers shying away from threatened lawsuits. One journalist, Paulette Cooper was framed for making bomb threats in an operation the church called 'freakout'. She very nearly went to prison, before the plot was found out and her name was cleared. She was sued by the church 15 times, and her career nearly ruined.

   How does the church of scientology get away with such behaviour? Through the profligate use of money, the hiring of battallions of lawyers and private investigators, and by making people afraid of them. Heber Jentsch, the president of the Church of Scientology, has said that "We are not a turn the other cheek religion". They have proven it over and over again. By creating a climate of fear, they have successfully hidden the truth about their practices and beliefs from most of the public. Exposes by Reader's Digest and Time Magazine have rolled right off their backs. Using copyrights and 'trade secret status' of their higher teachings have helped them keep sucking in the uninformed.

   The internet has changed that; in 1995 a newsgroup was created, called alt.religion.scientology. A newsgroup is like a bulletin board, where anybody can post messages, and read messages by others. It quickly became a gathering place for former scientologists, and people who had lost friends and family to the church. Information about other's fights against the church became available, and people learned that they were not alone. The church, of course, did not like this, and attempted to remove this newsgroup from the internet. That got a lot more people mad, folks who had never cared about Scientology one way or the other before. Secret church documents have now spread all over the world wide web, placed on web pages in countries where the church has no lawyers to try to stop them. Information about the church's true nature is freely available to anyone with a computer and a modem, or just a local library with an internet connnection.

   The last few years have seen pickets agianst the church in The USA, Canada, France, England, Ireland, Norway, Denmark and Germany. While the church claims to be constantly expanding, its own web site shows that the actual number of churchs and missions has shrunk precipitously. More and more people have seen the story of Lisa McPherson on tabloid television shows, and on CBS's Sixty Minutes. Bryant Gumble exposed how the church destroyed the Cult Awareness Network with over fifty lawsuits. The Wall Street Journal has told how the Church obtained an illegal secret agreement with the IRS to finally get its long desired tax free status in the early 1990s. Italy, and Greece have indicted Scientology organisations for fraud. In Germany, Scientologists are not allowed to hold government employment. Heber Jentsch, the president of the church, is wanted in Spain for jumping a 1 million dollar bond and fleeing the country to avoid prosecution for fraud. Canada has convicted the entire church for criminal behaviour, and watches them carefully.

   Thanks to modern communications, world-wide magazines, television, radio, and especially the internet, the truth about the cult of Scientology is out. They will continue to find it harder and harder to gain new recruits. Eventually they will wither and disappear.
"When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before."

Jacob Riis

Raven

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2009, 23:03 »
That's a great speech!  you need to read that at an upcoming protest

Offline ethercat

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2009, 00:21 »
I have always loved that speech.  Just have a couple of corrections.

   In the early 1960s, Hubbard bought an old cattle barge, renamed it the Freewinds, and took to the sea...

The boat Hubbard used (to stay on the run from the IRS) was called the Apollo.  The Freewinds (loaded with blue asbestos) was bought on Miscavige's watch.

Quote
Heber Jentsch, the president of the church, is wanted in Spain for jumping a 1 million dollar bond and fleeing the country to avoid prosecution for fraud. Canada has convicted the entire church for criminal behaviour, and watches them carefully.

Heber Jentzsch is the correct spelling, and these days, he is seldom, if ever, seen.  I guess his outburst with Bryant Gumbel on TV tipped them off that he was bad PR for scientology: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSy-y-ylPZI
And he did manage to avoid prosecution in Spain, eventually.

Thank you for posting this, wynot.
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Offline wynot

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2009, 07:54 »
...Just have a couple of corrections.

   In the early 1960s, Hubbard bought an old cattle barge, renamed it the Freewinds, and took to the sea...

The boat Hubbard used (to stay on the run from the IRS) was called the Apollo.  The Freewinds (loaded with blue asbestos) was bought on Miscavige's watch.

Quote
Heber Jentsch, the president of the church, is wanted in Spain for jumping a 1 million dollar bond and fleeing the country to avoid prosecution for fraud. Canada has convicted the entire church for criminal behavior, and watches them carefully.

Heber Jentzsch is the correct spelling...

I always appreciate corrections of facts, so please note all future publications will have this (Freewinds/Apollo) corrected; as to the spelling of Heber's name, well, I had the proofreader punished severely! But not too severely; after all, it was meant as a speech, and not for publication.

BTW, do you remember the url for the vid of the speech? I seem to remember it being posted somewhere, but darned if I remember where. Ted's archives, maybe?

'til next time;
wynot
« Last Edit: March 28, 2009, 08:23 by wynot »
"When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before."

Jacob Riis

Offline mefree

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2009, 08:57 »
Very nice speech.
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama

Offline ethercat

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2009, 10:43 »
BTW, do you remember the url for the vid of the speech? I seem to remember it being posted somewhere, but darned if I remember where. Ted's archives, maybe?

I don't remember seeing a video of it.  Are you sure there was one?

I do, however, remember you making an excellent post to the scientologist called Lurkmonster who was sent to "handle the newsgroup, alt.religion.scientology, about the "Differences Between Science and Scientology":

Newsgroups: alt.religion.scientology
Subject: Re: Fighting Scientology
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:37:11 GMT
From: wynot@arscc-atl.com
Message-ID: <36f31afc.81931872@news.mindspring.com>
References: <36ebbde9.408692464@news.erols.com> <37070e61.28442852@news.snafu.de> <36ebd5d7.414819455@news.erols.com> <36ed3ae4.3150072@news.concentric.net> <36ec0671.427263531@news.erols.com>

On Sun, 14 Mar 1999 19:01:01 GMT, nada@noneya.com (lurkmonster)
wrote:
>Have you noticed, that most critics seem to have an overwhelming
>need for the destruction of Scientology?
>Lurkmonster

Actually, Lurkie, I believe I am one of the few on here who thinks
that Scientology should be removed from the face of the earth. The
reason I feel that way is the way your cult pretends to be
scientific. May I point out some of the differences between science
and Scientology?

1: Science begins with the observation of reality. Scientology
begins with the denial that reality exists. (MEST?)

2: Science teaches that facts must be independently verifiable.
Scienology says that 'it's true if it's true for you'.

3: Science involves the formulation of hypotheses which may proved
or disproved by experiment. Scientology maintains that Hubbard
taught all the truth there is, and needs not present any
proof.(Out-tech?)

4: Science does not accept anecdotal evidence. Scientology presents
no other kind.

5: When scientists are presented with evidence that something they
believe is incorrect, all but a very few will change their beliefs.
Scientologists in the same condition claim the evidence is biased
because the presenter has a criminal past life.

6: The scientist's view of the universe has changed constantly over
the past 20 - 50 years, as new evidence has shown that previous
ideas were incorrect, or not complete enough. Scientology teachings
have remained remarkably static for 50 years, and entirely so since
Hubbard died (where are those new OT levels that have been promised
for so long?).

That is enough for now, monster person (I gotta' admit, you
got a nick just made for having fun with)... If you wish to believe
fantasies about previous lives, alien implants, and intergalactic
invaders, I have no problem with that, but so long as your church
pretends to be a science I will personally hope that it ceases to
exist, and actively endeavor to spread my opinion (in the form of
anti - pseudo-science memes). Once, at a picket, a passerby asked if
I though Scientologists were bad people. I told him that I did not
think that, only that they were deluded by Scientology, and wasting
their good hopes for a better life and world on beliefs which are
fallacies. Building their castles on sand...

Please Lurkmonster, demand proof. When they tell you they closed
down all the asylums in Italy, call your local Italian consulate or
embassy, like I did, and find out. When they tell you that 2 million
South African children were taught to read, ask where are the lists?
Ask why the South African government disavows any knowledge of such
a program? (South Africa has never been any trouble for Scientology
that I have heard of, btw.) Okay?

'Til next time;
Wynot
The Few, The Proud, The Banned;
2x on the Scieno-nanny.
_________________________________
Pickets are the one thing that Scientology hates the most because
they can't lie to their members about it, at least to the ones who
see it.. They can't demonstrate their OT abilities and 'postulate'
people away using Tone 40, which invalidates them. This is a direct
confront to their great powers and is what they hate the most and
all the lies they tell their members is only a picket away from
revealing itself.

LRonsScam, in a post to a.r.s.

'Til next time;

I'm glad for the opportunity to repost that.  Thank you for reminding me.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2009, 13:47 by ethercat »
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Offline SocialTransparency

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2009, 13:42 »
 :D Makes sense to me!

The Entity

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2009, 21:43 »
get the tape of this on yt

Offline wynot

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2009, 22:17 »
get the tape of this on yt

Link, please?
"When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before."

Jacob Riis

Offline Lorelei

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2009, 16:01 »
Lisa McPherson's story breaks my heart.

One of my first YouTube videos was about her. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGrVN1GwMjg

It suffers from newbie-itis, as I was just getting to learn how to use the software. Apparently the message is still comprehensible, however. I suppose that is the saving grace, if any. :)

Both long posts (the speech and reply to Lurkmonster) are EXCELLENT resources. I second the request to make a video of the speech.
"Once the foundation of a revolution has been laid down, it is almost always
in the next generation that the revolution is accomplished." -- Jean d'Alembert

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Raven

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2009, 16:46 »

Offline wynot

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2009, 21:36 »
get the tape of this on yt

Link, please?

yt= youtube

Yes Raven; it's just that I am sooooooo lazy!<GRIN> I want one little click, and I'm there...

'til next time;
wynot
"When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before."

Jacob Riis

Offline wynot

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2009, 21:50 »
...Both long posts (the speech and reply to Lurkmonster) are EXCELLENT resources. I second the request to make a video of the speech.

I have given ethercat the video of my little speech, and am hopeful she will find the time to digitize it soon. But the transcription is available, and you are welcome to use it in any way you find helpful. Same goes for the response to old Lurkie...

'til next time;
wynot
"When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before."

Jacob Riis

Offline Lorelei

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Re: What's it all about?
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2009, 19:19 »
This may be of some interest:

http://www.modemac.com/cgi-bin/wiki.pl/An_Introduction_to_Scientology

It is old, but very interesting, and is unaffiliated with Chanology / Anonymous.
"Once the foundation of a revolution has been laid down, it is almost always
in the next generation that the revolution is accomplished." -- Jean d'Alembert

The Human Wiki.
"I spend hours surfing the web for information, so you don't have to!"