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News Thetan:
Narconon Will Have to Show its Credentials - Topix
1 April 2010, 11:47 am

(Trois-Rivières) Like all drug rehabilitation facilities in the province of Quebec which provide room and board, Narconon Trois-Rivières will have to show its credentials in order to obtain certification from the Quebec Department of Health and Social Services [ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux], a requirement which will be compulsory beginning on July 1, 2011.

Just days after the publication of statements made by David Edgar Love, a former patient who became an employee and is now speaking out against certain methods used by the centre, the Mauricie Health and Social Services Agency [Agence de santé et de services sociaux de la Mauricie] said it will be keeping an eye on Narconon.

In the framework of Law 56, which provides for extending the compulsory certification of residences for the elderly to all organizations involved in drug rehabilitation, there are to be rigorous inspections to regulate and guarantee the safety and the quality of services," said Marc Lacour, director of social services.

As a result, the 14 organizations in our region will have to file an application and comply with all the requirements of the Department of Health and Social Services before July 2011. These requirements concern, in particular, the methods of intervention, the physical facilities, safety, employee training, and they might even include prohibiting affiliations to a religion or to a spiritual orientation.

It is known that Narconon has ties with with the Church of Scientology. Its methods of intervention are based on the teachings of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the Church of Scientology.

Since 2001, the centre has indeed been mired in controversy more than once. The latest example is the publication of statements made by David Edgar Love, who filed complaints with the Quebec Human Rights Commission [Commission des droits de la personne] and the Quebec Labour Standards Commission [Commission des normes du travail] for harassment and threats and who took the opportunity to lift the veil on certain treatment methods.

Former employees filed complaints

About ten former employees of the Narconon Trois-Rivières centre have filed complaints with the Quebec Labour Standards Commission alleging that they were not paid for hours worked.

But according to one of these former employees, Richard Lussier, there are at least 25 people in the same situation.

"It's such a hassle, but Narconon takes advantage of defenseless people to line their pockets. I had to complain to the Labour Standards Commission to get progress on my case. I'm not looking for trouble, I just want my money. But I know that many other employees haven't complained. In all, there are more than 25 of us who haven't been paid in recent months," said Lussier.

Lussier, who had been hired as a cook, was fired last month. "Narconon owes me between $1,200 and $1,300.

"That's a lot when you have to pay your rent. I spoke out loud to get what I'm owed, because this wasn't the first time it happened, but they preferred to fire me," he said.

Mr. Lussier admits having received some pay, for example $100 every two or three weeks. "The centre gives us a little something to make us keep our traps shut, they make wonderful promises, but they never give us our full pay," he said.

Marc Bernard, director of Narconon, acknowledges that former employees have not been paid.

"I think about ten complaints have been brought against us. The recession hurt us. So we accumulated a bit of a backlog in payroll. I can assure you that these people will be paid and that it will be done as quickly as possible. We don't take this lightly," he said.

He believes, however, that these former employees panicked. "It's the system that wants this, that led them to the Labour Standards Commission.

"Yet we are constantly working to have enough money to settle our debts," said Mr. Bernard.

Narconon provides therapies which last an average of three to four months. According to Mr. Bernard, the centre receives about 35 to 40 customers every three months.

But a former employee contends that the centre receives no more than twenty people a year. Most of the clientele is from Ontario, British Columbia, and Alberta.

Moreover, the costs of this therapy are particularly high, more than $5,000 a month, for a total of $20,000.

"How much does the funeral of an addict cost in your opinion? More than $12,000. In addition, we have an excellent success rate here: it's between 70 and 76 per cent, while the average for other centres is 10 per cent," said Mr. Bernard.

At present, an investigation is still being conducted by the Labour Standards Commission, which refuses to reveal more about the number and the content of the current complaints.

However, spokesperson Jean-François Pelchat did not hide the fact that Narconon has a "long trail" of complaints since 2005.

"Quite a few complaints were brought by employees, but, in most cases, the files are closed, either because the centre paid the claims or because an agreement was reached, or the complaint was not accepted, or the employee withdrew," said Mr. Pelchat.

Narconon Will Have to Show its Credentials - Topix~~~~FormerlyFooled ~FormerlyFooled~ FormerlyFooled~~~~



Source: Formerly Fooled and Finally Free From The Deceptive Cult Called Scientology

Lorelei:
I see they are pushing that "70% success rate" lie again.

David Love has information on that and says it is complete bogosity. He's not the only one.

From the 2010 Hamburg Symposium addressing the human rights abuses of Scientology:

Jerry Whitfield discusses Scientology front group Narconon (including its origins as the brainchild of a convicted felon, before being stolen by Hubbard and adapted for cult recruitment purposes) and his experiences as a Scientologist and Narconon staffer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cr_fgEwV3QQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGyZ8wHXv80
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiyHJMDNQX0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izHG77YwHG8

Apparently, as Mr. Whitfield reveals, that 70% number comes from a survey sent out by Narconon to former "students." The survey asked, "Have you started doing drugs again?" (among other things).

Now, if a logical person thinks about this, you are sending a survey that asks if (former?) drug addicts are engaging in illegal behaviors again. Further, you are asking (former?) drug addicts, not particularly renowned to be the most responsible people in the world, to return the survey to you.

Out of the (former?) drug addicts that BOTHERED TO RETURN THE SURVEY, and did not LIE about being off drugs, even with this stacked deck and completely unscientific and useless survey, THIRTY PERCENT still said NO, YOU DID NOTHING USEFUL FOR ME AT ALL.

That, apparently, is what they are claiming is a reliable, scientific, accurate and useful statistic, and what they are basing that 70% (or, often, more! they can't even get their lies straight if you Google Narconon!) "success rate" upon.

More accurate statistics reveal that the Narconon quackery has a success rate of approximately 6%. Meanwhile, doing nothing at all (except deciding to go "cold turkey" on one's own, without participating in any program of group) has a success rate of approximately 11%.

Thus, Narconon is WORSE than DOING NOTHING AT ALL.

This is far from being a rousing endorsement, if you ask me. The secret cult surprise in the middle is also a major concern. DNW cults preying on vulnerable people.

ethercat:

--- Quote from: Lorelei on April 01, 2010, 20:51 ---More accurate statistics reveal that the Narconon quackery has a success rate of approximately 6%. Meanwhile, doing nothing at all (except deciding to go "cold turkey" on one's own, without participating in any program of group) has a success rate of approximately 11%.

--- End quote ---

The key is deciding on one's own to do something.  Narconon does a disservice (well, many disservices, actually) to the people who succeed while in the program.  These individuals have done something important on their own, and narconon steals the credit from the individual and not only touts it as narconon's success instead of the individual's, but they even convince the individual that the success was due to narconon, and not due to the one who deserves the credit, the individual.

That could account for the lower recidivism rate among people who do it on their own; the feeling of success due to one's own actions can be a powerful "drug" in and of itself.


--- Quote from: News Thetan on April 01, 2010, 13:02 ---Moreover, the costs of this therapy are particularly high, more than $5,000 a month, for a total of $20,000.

"How much does the funeral of an addict cost in your opinion? More than $12,000.

--- End quote ---

I'm aware that this will sound terribly heartless, but here goes.  At least with the funeral, you only have to pay once, and you know when the job is done.

wynot:

--- Quote from: ethercat on April 01, 2010, 21:52 ---
I'm aware that this will sound terribly heatless, but here goes.  At least with the funeral, you only have to pay once, and you know when the job is done.

--- End quote ---

It does perhaps lack a little warmth... ;)

OTOH, it is accurate.

til next time;
wynot

ethercat:

--- Quote from: wynot on April 02, 2010, 09:07 ---It does perhaps lack a little warmth... ;)

--- End quote ---

Typo fixed. 

(I told you I was tired last night.)

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