Author Topic: Herald.ie: Scientology's drugs message after Bray murder  (Read 2836 times)

Offline mefree

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Herald.ie: Scientology's drugs message after Bray murder
« on: September 07, 2009, 12:07 »
http://www.herald.ie/national-news/city-news/scientologys-drugs-message-after-bray-murder-1880108.html



By Claire Murphy

Monday September 07 2009

Quote
A Church of Scientology-backed organisation has distributed free DVDs about anti-depressant drugs in the area where killer Shane Clancy lived.

The group, called the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), has given out copies of a documentary to residents in the Dalkey area, just weeks after the tragic murder-suicide in Bray.

Reports have indicated that gardai are investigating whether Shane, who murdered Seb Creane (22) before killing himself, may have misused anti-depressants that had been prescribed for him a week before the tragic night.

The DVD, which is also available online, details interviews with psychiatrists, psychologists, and journalists, exposing what it calls "psychiatric violations of human rights."

Making A Killing: The Untold Story Of Psychotropic Drugging is made in the US, but has been distributed in Ireland by a branch of the CCHR.

The DVD's tagline says it tells the "story of big-money drugs that fuel a $330bn psychiatric industry, without a single cure."

But since its release, one professional involved with the DVD has distanced himself from the CCHR.

Professor Howard Brody said that he believes anything produced by this organisation requires independent confirmation.

He said: "I regret very much allowing myself to have become involved in this project and would like it to be known that I disown and disapprove of the final product and the way that it has been disseminated."

One expert witness at the Columbine shootings has contacted the Herald to say that Shane Clancy may have reacted negatively to anti-depressants, affecting his state of mind at the time of the attack.

The executive director of the International Coalition for Drug Awareness, Dr Ann Tracy, believes that Shane may have lacked vital liver function necessary to metabolise anti-depressants.
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama

Offline ethercat

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Re: Herald.ie: Scientology's drugs message after Bray murder
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2009, 15:15 »
The rest of the article:
Quote
The US-based doctor pointed out that if levels of anti-depressant in Shane's blood were high, it does not necessarily mean that he was taking more than he should have.

She said: "It can mean that he, like seven to 10pc of the population, lacked the liver function necessary to break down the drug causing it to build to toxic levels."

CCHR spokesman Brian Daniels said the DVD was intended to "let the public know what is going on."

He said: "There are undiagnosed physical conditions which can manifest as mental illness."

clairemurphy@herald.ie

- Claire Murphy

I would just like to point out something which is not obvious from reading the article.  Dr. Ann Blake Tracy is not a medical doctor.  The state of Utah (where her domain name is registered) has no license information for her at https://secure.utah.gov/llv/llv .

I found that her web site describes her this way:
Quote
Ann Blake Tracy, a Ph.D. in Health Sciences with the emphasis on Psychology, , is the director of the International Coalition for Drug Awareness.

Wondering why exactly her degree, with an emphasis in Psychology, would qualify her to comment on someone's liver function, someone who she hadn't met, let alone examined, led me to discover that her degree isn't even a real degree!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2ESPQH2OONYBU?ie=UTF8&sort_by=MostRecentReview
Quote
In contrast to students who earned degrees at accredited schools, you'll rarely see Ann Tracy mention what school she attended. However, in a court hearing in Arkansas (David Eric WOOD v. STATE of Arkansas, Opinion delivered September 5, 2001), she "testified that she received a bachelor's degree in psychology and biblical studies from Coral Ridge Baptist University in Utah. She also holds a Ph.D. degree in health sciences, with emphasis on psychology, from George Wythe College."

Those are simply two different names for the same unaccredited school at the same campus with the same unqualified teachers. The founder (and, for years, one of the main teachers) of George Wythe College also has unaccredited degrees from Coral Ridge Baptist University--notice, it's the same name as the diploma mill that Tracy "graduated" from. (He does have an accredited BA in International Relations from BYU.) How could he teach her "science" when his areas were Biblical Studies, Christian Political Science, and Religious Education? Furthermore, how can a business with no accreditation, led by someone whose degrees are so shaky then confer a "doctorate" on Ms. Tracy?

I then found out more about these schools on this site: http://themakingofauniversity.blogspot.com/2009/01/diploma-demille.html
Quote
But, surely, this giving of doctorate degrees for previous work—the old diploma mill catch-all “life experience”—could never happen at Oliver Van DeMille’s own school. After all, someone like DeMille, who worked “eighty hours a week, sometimes more,” would not just hand out degrees to people who had done neither class work at George Wythe College nor been mentored by its fine staff. Or would he? According to the Deseret News, which is owned by the LDS Church, he would:

    Ann Blake Tracy, according to the International Coalition for Drug Awareness web site, has a doctorate in health sciences with an emphasis on psychology. There is no mention of the institution that awarded her this degree — George Wythe College, in Cedar City. Tracy explains that the Ph.D. was awarded for “lifetime experience,” specifically for the writing of “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?” which she says she has been told is the equivalent of, or “far beyond,” a dissertation.

    Self-published, the book contains spelling and punctuation errors and incomplete sentences (although Tracy says an edited version will be published in the next few weeks). It also contains page after page of references to studies that seem to cast a cloud over the safety of antidepressants . . .

    . . . “It’s hard to know where to begin to detail the cognitive errors she’s making,” says psychiatrist Tomb about Tracy’s book. “She is really taking license with the scientific method.” Yes, Tracy is passionate about the evils of antidepressants, Tomb says, “but passion has very little place in the scientific method in terms of deciding what is accurate and truthful.” The book is full of vignettes, but vignettes don’t tell the whole story, he argues. “You could take aspirin and do the same thing: comb the literature and find horrible things that have occurred with aspirin.”

It’s nice to see that Anne Blake Tracy carried on the Coral Ridge tradition of “spelling and punctuation errors and incomplete sentences” in her book. But seriously, this self-taught “graduate” of George Wythe College went on to being an “expert” witness submitted in an Arkansas rape case (and, to my mind, that is serious). Unlike DeMille’s institution of higher learning, though, the Court of Appeals of Arkansas was not so impressed with Tracy’s “life experience,” ruling “that her intended testimony was not reliable and that the methodology she used was suspect.” Thankfully, because of the court’s due diligence, a man who’d been convicted of raping his stepsons could not use “Dr.” Tracy’s testimony that Paxil made him do it.

I have not found anything concrete enough (yet?) for me to say that drugawareness.org and International Coalition for Drug Awareness are entities owned or controlled by scientology, but I have found that quite often, CCHR cites Tracy as a supporting resource, and obviously from this article, Tracy backs up what CCHR says, so it may be a sort of symbiotic relationship. 

At any rate, this incident of handing out of CCHR propaganda immediately after a tragedy is not an isolated one, and appears to me to be just another attempt to capitalize on someone else's pain.  Sigh.  Just another...  gosh, I sound jaded.   :-\

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Offline mefree

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Re: Herald.ie: Scientology's drugs message after Bray murder
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2009, 18:34 »
Just another example in which deception is used in an attempt to legitimize CCHR and its propaganda.
The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis.
-Dalai Lama

Offline Lorelei

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Re: Herald.ie: Scientology's drugs message after Bray murder
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2009, 05:17 »
I find their gleeful vulturing of the dead to advance their agenda morally reprehensible, and am not in the least bit surprised that yet another shill with faked credentials is loudly tooting the cult's horn without regard ot the survivor's feelings or the actual truth of the cult's unsubstantiated claims.
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Offline ethercat

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Re: Herald.ie: Scientology's drugs message after Bray murder
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2009, 23:06 »
I find their gleeful vulturing of the dead to advance their agenda morally reprehensible, and am not in the least bit surprised that yet another shill with faked credentials is loudly tooting the cult's horn without regard ot the survivor's feelings or the actual truth of the cult's unsubstantiated claims.

At times, scientologists have accused critics/protestors of using the deaths of scientologists to the same ends, but I think the difference lies with how the grieving family members feel, and how long there is between the death and the mention of it by critics and protestors. 

For instance, Lisa McPherson, whose unfortunate death has been the topic of a number of protests and candlelight vigils.  Her family approved of and supported the protests and vigils that came from her death.  They even came to some of the larger protests in Clearwater.  I remember at the Lisa McPherson picket and vigil in Clearwater, 1999, I had made some pins out of rubber cockroaches (the coroner had said that the numerous small scabs on her deceased body were the result of cockroach bites), and had them to give away at the picket.  Now I knew this was a somewhat gruesome thing, but I didn't know Lisa's family would be there.  When they saw me wearing my pin, they knew exactly what it was, and what it was for, and I was completely surprised when Lisa's cousin asked me if I had any more, and if he could have one!  I did have more, and I did give him one, and he put it on and wore it that day (and possibly afterward).

Another example is Noah Lottick's family.  Dr. and Mrs. (Ed and Sally) Lottick were also very supportive of people who expose scientology, and who call attention to their son's death.  More recently, Marcus Stuckenbrock, the brother of Uwe Stuckenbrock (who died in the last year while in the Sea Org), has also been in communication with protestors and critics in a supportive way, and, I believe, is still posting to the Ex-scientologist Message Board.

I seriously doubt that the remaining family of Shane Clancy supports the actions of the scientologists in handing out the CCHR's propaganda, particularly so soon after the tragic events, and I also remember CCHR doing something similar not too long ago, but don't recall the details without some research.

People should be careful of the feelings of family and other grieving people when calling attention to a death, but since, according to the teachings of scientology, the "thetan" will pick up a new body, scientologists are not really as tuned into the feelings of the rest of the world when it comes to death as they should be.  They seem to seal their own fate with these tasteless activities.
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